Tag Archives: Whidbey Island

Admiralty Point – Featured Art Print

“Admiralty Point” is an art print of a lighthouse using a fauvism oil technique. This technique focuses on bold brush strokes, bright colors and abstract shapes. The setting is the Admiralty Point Lighthouse that is located with Fort Casey on Whidbey Island north of Seattle. The lighthouse and fort are situated on the northern end of Puget Sound. Thoughts?


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Fort Casey – Excerpts from a Photo Shoot

I am continuing with my sharing of photography I did when I was up in the Seattle area in September. Today, I have attached 9 shots I took of Fort Casey on Whidbey Island. I think these shots are great examples of how to create a story through photography. Most of these shots are architecturally oriented and when shooting this type of element, I look for interesting angles or framing opportunities to create a unique visual experience while still trying to relay the look and feel of the subject.

So lets talk about Fort Casey so you know what you are looking at. Today it is a 467-acre state park that houses the remnants of the physical fort and guns along with Admiralty Head Lighthouse. Fort Casey was part of a trio of forts that were built to protect the Puget Sound from invasion by sea. They were called the Triangle of Fire and were known for their big guns that had disappearing carriages that could be lowered for protection and then raised to fire. Building started in 1897 and the forts became obsolete with the invention of the airplane (they weren’t designed against air attack) and the modernization of battleships.

Fort Casey 1

Fort Casey 1

In the first shot, you get a perspective of how the fort sits above the entrance to the Puget Sound.

Fort Casey 2

Fort Casey 2

The second shot gives you an idea of the structures that were created to house the big guns that sat on their disappearing carriages (the structure to the right), with the separate towers to the left, I would assume for a visual over the guns and protection against return fire.

Fort Casey 3

Fort Casey 3

The third shot shows the top of the Admiralty Head Lighthouse just north of the fort. The view would be from shot 2 and turning around.

Fort Casey 4

Fort Casey 4

The fourth shot is more of the same front building, but showing one of the big guns.

Fort Casey 5

Fort Casey 5

The fifth shot shows a close up of the big gun with my lovely wife in the picture for a perspective of sheer size of the guns (yes, she has no idea she is now part of a blog 🙂 ).

Fort Casey 6

Fort Casey 6

The sixth shot shows more of the building. You can actually go into the bunkers and wander around. Most of them interconnect underground and I assume that’s for protection during an attack.

Fort Casey 7

Fort Casey 7

The seventh shot shows more of the structure. One of the platforms for the carriage of the big guns is just out of sight in the top left, but shown in the next picture.

Fort Casey 8

Fort Casey 8

The eighth shot is one of the platforms supporting the carriages for the big guns.

Fort Casey 9

Fort Casey 9

The ninth shot shows a group of buildings just a bit further inland and slightly up hill from the main bunkers.

The entire experience was fascinating and I had no idea this type of bunker had been built in that era along the Puget Sound. Thoughts?

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Admiralty Head Lighthouse – Featured Art Print

My featured Art Print this week is the Admiralty Head Lighthouse done in black and white from my Black and White Photography One Gallery. It’s one of the six new art prints just added to that gallery.

The Admiralty Head Lighthouse is located on Whidbey Island north of the Seattle area in the state of Washington. It coexists with what was Fort Casey and is now part of the state park system. The location is the entrance to the Puget Sound. The lighthouse guided ships into the sound; while Fort Casey with it’s large guns protected the sound. The setting has a sweeping view of the water and across it to the Olympic Mountain Range on the Olympic Peninsula. The lighthouse was put into operation in 1861, rebuilt and moved slightly north to accommodate the guns of Fort Casey in 1903 and ultimately decommissioned in 1922. It was acquired and reopened by Washington State Parks in the mid 1950’s.

For this print, I went black and white to capture not only the mood of the day (rain and sun with heavy rain clouds moving in), but the contrast within the structure itself and the natural setting surrounding it. I shoot my photographs in RAW, which gives me the flexibility to use strong detail and the ability to adjust the many elements of a picture. With this shot, I went for maximum detail and played with the contrast and lighting to create the end result. The final art print does a great job capturing the look and feel of our visit to the lighthouse that day. Thoughts?

 

 

I invite you to come into the gallery to view the addition of new art prints to the collection in Black and White Photography One.

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