Tag Archives: sketching

Heceda Head Lighthouse Sketched

One of my favorite lighthouses along the Oregon Coastline is the Heceda Head Lighthouse. From this perspective, you see the lighthouse out on the edge of a bluff and the caretakers house snuggled above a small beach. The caretakers house is closer to the Pacific Coast Highway, which follows this rugged coastline and presents this perfect view of the complex as you approach from the south.

In creating this print, I used a sketching technique with soft watercolors to present this as a casual look across a small harbor towards the complex.

Heceda Head Lighthouse Complex

This second print focuses on the lighthouse itself. Again, I used the same sketching technique creating this casual look.

Heceda Head Lighthouse Sketched

Thoughts?

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Simplistic Composition – Simple Subject Matter

Sometimes the simple approach to a print is the best way to go, whether that is the composition of the subject or the subject itself. If you look at still life art prints, the subject matter is usually very simplistic like a bowl of fruit or floral arrangement. In composing the piece, the artist or photographer keeps the print clear of unrelated objects to allow the visual focus on the main subject.

In taking this approach with other items, you can create art prints or photographs that have a very defined visual focus to tell a story. The manner in which the presentation is created can also help keep the focus on the subject or object you are presenting, by creating an overall mood or look.

I have attached two samples to highlight what I’m referring to. The first example is a bookcase located in a log cabin from the Sharlot Hall Museum in Prescott, Arizona. By it’s very nature there is a lot of objects in this print, but by keeping the composition of the presentation limited to the bookcase, you have simplified that aspect. To further tone down the variety of objects, I chose a sketching technique to soften the presentation. The overall result is a more simplistic presentation with a simple subject matter.

The second attachment has less subject matter to begin with and the composition keeps the eye focused on this part of the log cabin. By having a suggestion of a window with a small desk and chair between that and a door, it creates a small intimate space where you can imagine someone working at the desk. The sketching technique softens the overall look, creating a simplistic warm and inviting visual effect.

 

 

Thoughts?

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Sketched Scenes from Sailing the Islands in the Pacific Northwest

I have attached two sketched scenes I created from a trip we took a few years ago to Henry Island in the Pacific Northwest. We were staying with our daughter and her husband in Seattle and were headed to Henry Island where our son-in-law’s family had a couple of homes. To get to Henry Island, we took a ferry from Anacortes, Washington to Friday Harbor on San Juan Island. We then drove across the island to Roche Harbor where their was a family boat docked for the final leg of the journey over to Henry Island.

The first art print represents the scene I saw as we came into Friday Harbor, which is on San Juan Island. The second art print was a sailboat I saw as we headed back going by Lopez island. It was a beautiful day for sailing.

Thoughts?

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The Seattle Great Wheel – Angles and Architectural Elements

Always looking for an interesting aspect or angle to a subject matter, I have attached two prints I created of The Seattle Great Wheel. The official website to the Seattle Great Wheel is here (the website has a great overall picture of the ferris wheel at the end of pier 57 along the bay front of downtown Seattle). It really is an impressive ferris wheel and has fast become one of the main attractions in downtown Seattle.

I did a photo shoot a few years back and spent quite awhile trying to capture unique shots of this very large ferris wheel. I wanted something a little different to highlight the architectural detail of this beautiful wheel. As I went through the shots and started narrowing it down to unique angles, I thought that with the geometric simplicity of the structure, why not try some of these angles in a sketching or ink pen style…both simplistic in visual appearance and focusing specifically on the structure.

With the help of Adobe Photoshop I came up with these prints that portray two very different angles and perspectives of the gondolas as they went around the large wheel.

 

“Seattle Great Wheel”

Thoughts?

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The Caboose and Train Station Platform – Black and White Sketches

Anyone that has been following my work, knows I have an affinity to black and white photography. As I have stated before, I began serious photography with black and white film and had access to a dark room to develop my own prints. The mood, contrast and elements that become center stage in a photograph is different when seen in black and white versus the same shot in color. With these prints I have taken that look one step further with a pencil sketching technique. Using a sketched look versus the original photograph gives the final print a softer more rustic feel.

 

For this post I chose two sketches I created from the Issaquah Train Station (now a museum in Issaquah, Washington). I have featured numerous prints from this location as it lent itself to so many opportunities.

I love these old baggage carts sitting on the platform.

Thoughts?

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The Red Railroad Car – Featured Art Print

 

The Red Railroad Car – is a wall art print I created using a colored pencil sketching technique to create this look. This technique uses strong, but narrow diagonal lines with bright colors.

The setting is an old train car located along a path in Rockford, Michigan. The train looks like it might have been used as a diner at some point, but now sits abandoned. Thoughts?


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Grand Canyon Sketched – Featured Art Prints

I have been working with some of the shots I took at the Grand Canyon in early August (The Grand Canyon – Excerpts From a Photo Shoot) and am attaching five art prints I created that I just added to my Landscape Watercolor Gallery. I created these art prints with a sketching/watercolor technique that creates a very detailed sketched look with soft colors. The overall look is soft and subtle, but when you really look into the print you see detail you don’t initially notice at first. This is the appeal these have as it relates to art prints of the Grand Canyon. The overall beauty and look is overwhelmingly breathtaking and larger than life. Man pales by comparison when presented alongside this type of setting. Let’s take a look at them….


 

The first print gives you a partial panorama, with the foreground on the left, which is the canyon facing side of Lookout Studio. Your eyes are drawn into the detail and you see people in the sketch. The more your eye is drawn into the print, you start to see just how many people. This type of detail doesn’t distract from the overall look, but actually compliments the look I was going for.

 


 

The second print gives you a sense of depth, with the purple sketching in the background creating the canyon’s distance and depth. The overlook creates a great foreground focal point and then again, you start to see the people. They are small in comparison to the overall scene, but become an important part of the small detail.


 

With the third print, the overlook in the foreground becomes the prominent element of the print with the people milling about. In this art print, the canyon depth takes backstage to the beauty of the rock strata and the people on the overlook.


 

The fourth art print focuses on the rock strata of the South Rim and the Grand Canyon Village is almost an “oh, there is something there” as your eye sweeps the scene. Once you realize the village is there, you start to see the small detail of buildings and people.


 

The fifth and final art print is the El Tovar Lodge. I love the architecture of the building as it sits atop the South Rim.


 

My objective with these prints was to portray the beauty and scope of this natural wonder and present prints that demonstrate the sheer size of the setting versus man. Thoughts?


 

I invite you to visit my Landscape Watercolor Gallery to enjoy these prints and many more.

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Lighthouse Sketches – Featured Art Prints

For anyone that has been following my blog or work, this will come as no big surprise. I have a penchant for black and white photography and find that it can create a different visual experience than color photography, even side by side with the same subject matter. I also want to add to that list, black and white sketches. This week, I am featuring two new prints recently completed and added to my B&W Sketches Gallery. They are of the West Point Lighthouse and the Mukilteo Lighthouse, both located in the Pacific Northwest just outside of Seattle. The sketching aspect creates a soft and warm tone as opposed to photography which plays off of shapes and contrast to create a mood.

The first print is the West Point Lighthouse.  West Point Lighthouse sits on a piece of land that juts out into the Puget Sound and marks the northern end of Elliot Bay which lines the downtown waterfront of Seattle.

The second art print is of the Mukilteo Lighthouse. Mukilteo Lighthouse is located in the town of Mukilteo on the mainland across from Whidbey Island north of the Seattle area.

 

This sketching technique creates a soft, warm traditional look to buildings that have unique architectural elements. This type of print creates a timeless element and in this case honors the history of these types of landmarks. Thoughts?

I invite you to visit my B&W Sketches Gallery to enjoy these prints and many more.

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