Tag Archives: sepia tone

Green Wagon – Featured Art Print From My Sepia Photography Collection

The art print I wanted to feature today is from my Sepia Photography Collection titled “Green Wagon”.  The print is a sepia photograph of an old wagon used to haul goods and produce between town and the farm or ranch, circa 1800’s.

I liked the look of the wagon in this shot, and wanted to focus on the wagon bed and wooden wheels. The wagon has a long bed to haul a week or more of supplies between town and a farm or ranch. Conversely, it is built to haul produce in large quantities from the farm or ranch into town. Since time didn’t permit daily trips, you needed to be able to load large quantities when you did go into town. Notice the detail of the wagon from the steel side supports to the large wooden wheels. The wagon was built for endurance in its day, but today sits protected along the streets of an old west town fenced off from people trying to climb on board.

Because of the subject matter of this photograph, my inclination was to convert it into a sepia tone print. Sepia photography is the brown color tones we associate with very old photographs. The look is a result of the technique used in developing photographic film during the 1800’s and early 1900’s. Today we can create that same look digitally.  My first step was to convert this photograph into sepia, which I did. I also liked the color of the wagon and the wheels in the original shot, so I played with allowing some of the green and red to bleed through. I liked the effect with just a light touch of color. To finish off that old west look and feel, I added some subtle texture for added warmth. Thoughts?

I invite you to come into the gallery to view the new additions to the collection in Sepia Photography.

Please visit my main gallery: TheWallGallery (All domestic orders over $60.00 – free shipping!)

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Wagon Wheels – Featured Art Print From my Sepia Photography Collection

The art print I wanted to feature today is from my Sepia Photography Collection titled “Wagon Wheels”.  This art print is a sepia photograph of two wagon wheels on an old west wagon. The wagon dates back to the 1800’s in the heyday of the “Wild West”.

I liked the wagon in this shot, and wanted to focus on the wooden wheels rimmed with steel. Notice the wood grain even in the spokes and throughout the back of the wagon. The original leaf spring can still be seen supporting the back structure of the wagon on the axle (not that they ever really made a ride smooth between the ruts in the dirt and the unforgiving wheels). The position of the wagon on a dirt street completed the look I was after for an old west art print.

Because of the subject matter of this photograph, my inclination was to convert it into a sepia tone print. Sepia photography is the brown color tones we associate with very old photographs. The look is a result of the technique used in developing photographic film during the 1800’s and early 1900’s. Today we can create that same look digitally.  My first step was to convert this photograph into sepia, which I did. I also liked the color of the wheel in the original shot, so I played with allowing some of the green to bleed through. I liked the effect with just a light touch of color. To finish off that old west look and feel, I added some subtle texture for added warmth. Thoughts?

I invite you to come into the gallery to view the new additions to the collection in Sepia Photography.
Please visit my main gallery: TheWallGallery (All domestic orders over $60.00 – free shipping!)
Follow my work:
Facebook: TheWallGallery by Kirt Tisdale. (Page likes are always appreciated!)

Google+: TheWallGallery

Twitter: KirtWallGallery

The Shack – Excerpts from a Photo Shoot

A couple of weeks ago, I was out on a shoot when I spotted this old shack. I have a fascination with old buildings in general, but dilapidated shacks seemed to have a photographic appeal. I especially like them in a sepia format as that gives the picture a dated and historical look. Today I wanted to share some of those steps starting with the original capture.

Shack Original Photograph

Shack Original Photograph

From the original, I cropped the frame to have the final product focused on the shack in the center of the picture….

Shack Initial Cropping

Shack Initial Cropping

So, we now have the shack more prominent in the photo, but all of the electrical lines distract from the main goal…old rustic look….

Electrical Lines Removed

Electrical Lines Removed

With the electrical lines removed, the look speaks more rural, but I think I want to crop one last time to pull the shack in better….

Final Crop

Final Crop

So with my final crop done, I like the framing of the shack and now turn the print into a sepia tone print…

Sepia Shack

Sepia Shack

The final print looks like a picture taken years ago of an old ranch house abandoned in a very rural area. When in reality, the original picture was just taken two weeks ago and the abandoned farm-house sits a few blocks off a major freeway in a high growth area near Phoenix.

Please visit my main gallery: TheWallGallery (All domestic orders over $60.00 – free shipping!)

Follow my work:

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“Plug The Roof” The Art Print of the Week

I updated my Sepia Gallery this week and the art print of the week is one of the new additions. This print is a shot of two dilapidated farm buildings (ok, let’s be candid…shacks). The back one has an obvious roof problem. The front one has moss covering the roof. I originally spotted these buildings from the freeway one day and they stuck with me. Later, I decided to get closer to them for a photo shoot which required hiking through a very marshy field to get the angle I wanted. I decided to use the sepia tone on this art print because of the obvious aged condition of the structures and sepia unto itself reminds us of old photographs. Actual location is just outside of Issaquah, Washington in the foothills of the Cascades.

Plug The Roof

Plug The Roof

source:  Sepia Gallery

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A Photo Shoot “The Door”

A couple of weeks ago my wife mentioned that while she was out shopping she went into a candy shop that she knew I would want to do a photo shoot of. She knows the kind of stuff I look for, so I was instantly intrigued with her comment. Turns out, the candy shop was a candy manufacturer: Boehms Candies and Chocolates. The original owner was Austrian and the shop and manufacturing facility have a very distinct Bavarian architecture. The place is a tourist draw located in the foothills of the Cascade Mountains in the eastern Seattle suburb of Issaquah. With a distinct Bavarian look, there is also a replica of a 12th century Swiss chapel. It was the architecture of the chapel that my wife knew would appeal to my photographic skills. I took a number of interesting shots that day, but wanted to focus on a specific architectural element that grabbed my attention. That would be the front door to the chapel, thus the title “The Door”. The craftsmanship of the door is incredible and makes a good photo series unto itself.  I have attached two different shots from that day. With each shot, I have also included some of my proposed art prints utilizing watercolor techniques and sepia tones.

The first shot…

Door 1 Original Photograph

Door 1 Original Photograph

Taking this photograph and creating a watercolor from it creates the next picture…

Door 1 Watercolor

Door 1 Watercolor

a  very traditional feel…

Since the subject matter is historic and old, I thought a sepia tone print might highlight that aspect…..

Door 1 Sepia Tone

Door 1 Sepia Tone

Looks like a picture taken years ago….

Ok…so same door, just a little different angle…

Door Angle 2

Door Angle 2

And as a watercolor……

Door Angle 2 Watercolor

Door Angle 2 Watercolor

And using an abstract type drawing technique…

Door Angle 2 Abstract Watercolor

Door Angle 2 Abstract Watercolor

and finally the sepia tone….

Door Angle 2 Sepia Tone

Door Angle 2 Sepia Tone

The art prints are still in their rough stages and I am still working through the rest of that particular photo shoot, but wanted to share what I had so far.

Thoughts? Comments? Please visit my main gallery: TheWalllGallery … and follow my work on my Facebook page – TheWallGallery by Kirt Tisdale. (Page likes are always appreciated!) Thanks!

More Sepia Prints

I added about 25 new art prints to my Sepia Gallery located in my online art gallery: The Wall Gallery.  I wanted to share a few of them here. I love the sepia look for that old world rustic appearance. As I have discussed in prior blogs, the subject matter needs to lend itself to that same ‘feel”. Sepia prints work really well in a number of decors bringing an element of age and history.

Let’s start with the first picutre which I call “Abandoned Farm“. This shot was taken near the Amana Colonies, Iowa in mid February of this year. It was one of those shots that felt good, but I wasn’t sure until I looked at the print in full size. I liked it so much, I have used this shot as a basis for a watercolor and an oil. I like the overall composition and knew it would also look great as a sepia print.

The sepia tone makes it look like it could have been taken in the 30’s or earlier.

The next shot is of old farm equipment just sitting in a field. I took the picture near North Bend, Washington while I was hiking along the Snoqualmie River. This shot was taken with the sole intent of using it as a sepia print. The subject matter lent itself perfectly.

On that same hike, I came across the next two shots and also took them with the sole intent of using them for sepia prints. The aged look and composition spoke volumes to me….

This cabin was right on the banks of the Snoqualmie River. Just a few cabins up , I came across the next shot….

(I would also like to point out that the featured picture at the top of the post came from this same area of the river bank. I enjoyed the cat trying to hide in the shadows.)

So shifting geography, a couple of other prints from the other side of the country…New England.

The first print is of a house on Martha’s Vineyard. The age and weathering of this home lends itself to the sepia tone.

And for the last sample, a large sail boat harbored in a small fishing village in Maine.

Sail boats have that timeless look, especially the larger ones.

These are just a few of the samples I added to The Sepia Gallery….the subject matter in the gallery is “rustic or historic” in appearance. See what you think. Thanks!

Sepia Urns

I was going through some of my stock photography from a few years ago when I came across these prints. These three prints were taken on the grounds of the Kuleto Estate. The Kuleto Estate is a winery located above the Napa Valley. I highly recommend anyone going to the wine country in Northern California to schedule some time for a tour. It is by appointment only and is off the beaten path, but the grounds of the estate and their wine are both incredible and worth the effort. That said, the estate has an eclectic mix of imported  items giving it a look somewhere between Tuscany and Mexico. These shots are part of one of the main fountains. I thought the urns and iron pot lent themselves well to a sepia look.

The texture of the pot and the grapevine planted in it, make this an old world look which the sepia tones augment. This pot along with similar ones sit by the fountain. The fountain is comprised of large urns that bubble water….see next picture.

Notice the two iron pots with grape vines framing the shot. The large urns were imported for this fountain and if my memory serves me correctly, I believe it was from Mexico.

I love the texture of the pots and the sutlety of the bubbling water….you have to look close to see it  coming out of the urns.

The entire feel of the fountain is “Old World”, which I think the sepia tones highlight.

I will soon be adding these shots and a few more to my Sepia Gallery located in my main art gallery. If you like sepia tone prints, please take a look.

The Hacienda

These pictures are from a time gone by in the old Southwest.

I grabbed this shot literally on the grounds of the Alamo. What I wanted to take a look at today was how the same picture done in different media creates a completely different feel to the same subject matter.

The first picture below is the original shot I took in May on the grounds of the Alamo in San Antonio. I loved the look and the rustic appeal of this scene.

Original Photograph

Original Photograph

After cropping the shot, I worked with the picture using a variety of media to create different looks for different decors.

The picture below is the black and white shot. There are enough strong lines and contrast in this picture to make a black and white interesting. Not every shot holds up in black and white.

From the B&W Gallery in Kirt's on-line Art Gallery

From the B&W Gallery in Kirt’s main art gallery

Nice contrast and this type of looks lends itself to a modern artistic decor.

Because the subject matter is “historical, rustic and of days gone by”, I also presented it in a sepia tone. The very nature of the sepia print evokes old images since prints originally used this format.

From the Sepia Gallery in Kirt's main Art Gallery.

From the Sepia Gallery in Kirt’s main art gallery.

The sepia tones automatically give you a warmer picture, not as bold as the black and white. This print would look good in a decor that embraces earth tones and/or uses items that have an old rustic appeal.

From there, I painted the scene using a traditional watercolor approach. This gives the picture a soft relaxing look. The colors become warm and soothing…

giving you a picture that invites you in to sit and relax.  This picture would look great in a casual comfortable decor.

Then, just from my own curiosity … I also painted the scene with a bolder more abstract watercolor…

The result being a much more bolder contemporary picture. This style would bring an historical subject matter into a modern contemporary decor style.

What are your thoughts? Using the same core elements, but presenting them in different styles creates totally different looks. Each of these stands on its own and is the right picture for different decors. I welcome your feedback and as always invite you to look at my main gallery: TheWallgallery.com. Thanks!

Sepia Prints

These prints have just been added to my Sepia Gallery on my Main Art Gallery Website. As a follow up to my earlier blog Covered Bridges Oregon Style, these prints are the ones that I selected to do in sepia tones (I am still working on watercolor and oils from that shoot).  I like the look it creates on certain subjects. Since by definition it creates that old rustic look, it applies better to those types of subject matters. Check out the gallery and let me know what you think.

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