Tag Archives: puget sound

West Point Lighthouse in Fauvism – Featured Art Prints

I featured West Point Lighthouse in Seattle a couple of years ago with some of the photographs I took while visiting the site. It sits on a piece of land that juts out into the Puget Sound and marks the northern most tip of Elliot Bay (Elliot Bay is the body of water that lines the downtown area). More info: here.

I created these three art prints using a fauvism technique. For those not familiar with this style, it is a bold style created in the early 20th century by artists who wanted to express emotion with their subjects using surreal colors and painterly techniques creating the subject matter. More info: here.

These three prints represent the lighthouse from the same angle, but from different distances. Each distance creates its own composition and delivers a slightly different story. Thoughts?

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West Point Up Close – Featured Art Print

West Point Up Close – is an art print of a lighthouse using a fauvism oil technique. This technique focuses on bold brush strokes, bright colors and abstract shapes. The setting is the West Point Lighthouse that sits on a piece of land that juts out into the Puget Sound and marks the northern end of Elliot Bay which lines the downtown waterfront of Seattle. Thoughts?


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West Point in Watercolor – Featured Art Print

“West Point in Watercolor” is an art print I am featuring from my Lighthouse/Nautical Gallery. The print is done using a subtle watercolor technique of a lighthouse. This style creates a soft casual look keeping the focal point on the lighthouse itself. I wanted to present a print that helps you feel the gentle warm breeze coming off of the water, rustling through the grass as you approach the building.

The setting for this particular print is the West Point Lighthouse that sits on a piece of land that juts out into the Puget Sound. This point marks the northern end of Elliot Bay, which is the body of water that downtown Seattle sits on as part of the waterways around the Puget Sound. Thoughts?

I invite you into the Lighthouse/Nautical Gallery to view additional art prints.

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Fort Casey – Excerpts from a Photo Shoot

I am continuing with my sharing of photography I did when I was up in the Seattle area in September. Today, I have attached 9 shots I took of Fort Casey on Whidbey Island. I think these shots are great examples of how to create a story through photography. Most of these shots are architecturally oriented and when shooting this type of element, I look for interesting angles or framing opportunities to create a unique visual experience while still trying to relay the look and feel of the subject.

So lets talk about Fort Casey so you know what you are looking at. Today it is a 467-acre state park that houses the remnants of the physical fort and guns along with Admiralty Head Lighthouse. Fort Casey was part of a trio of forts that were built to protect the Puget Sound from invasion by sea. They were called the Triangle of Fire and were known for their big guns that had disappearing carriages that could be lowered for protection and then raised to fire. Building started in 1897 and the forts became obsolete with the invention of the airplane (they weren’t designed against air attack) and the modernization of battleships.

Fort Casey 1

Fort Casey 1

In the first shot, you get a perspective of how the fort sits above the entrance to the Puget Sound.

Fort Casey 2

Fort Casey 2

The second shot gives you an idea of the structures that were created to house the big guns that sat on their disappearing carriages (the structure to the right), with the separate towers to the left, I would assume for a visual over the guns and protection against return fire.

Fort Casey 3

Fort Casey 3

The third shot shows the top of the Admiralty Head Lighthouse just north of the fort. The view would be from shot 2 and turning around.

Fort Casey 4

Fort Casey 4

The fourth shot is more of the same front building, but showing one of the big guns.

Fort Casey 5

Fort Casey 5

The fifth shot shows a close up of the big gun with my lovely wife in the picture for a perspective of sheer size of the guns (yes, she has no idea she is now part of a blog 🙂 ).

Fort Casey 6

Fort Casey 6

The sixth shot shows more of the building. You can actually go into the bunkers and wander around. Most of them interconnect underground and I assume that’s for protection during an attack.

Fort Casey 7

Fort Casey 7

The seventh shot shows more of the structure. One of the platforms for the carriage of the big guns is just out of sight in the top left, but shown in the next picture.

Fort Casey 8

Fort Casey 8

The eighth shot is one of the platforms supporting the carriages for the big guns.

Fort Casey 9

Fort Casey 9

The ninth shot shows a group of buildings just a bit further inland and slightly up hill from the main bunkers.

The entire experience was fascinating and I had no idea this type of bunker had been built in that era along the Puget Sound. Thoughts?

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Admiralty Head Lighthouse – Featured Art Print

My featured Art Print this week is the Admiralty Head Lighthouse done in black and white from my Black and White Photography One Gallery. It’s one of the six new art prints just added to that gallery.

The Admiralty Head Lighthouse is located on Whidbey Island north of the Seattle area in the state of Washington. It coexists with what was Fort Casey and is now part of the state park system. The location is the entrance to the Puget Sound. The lighthouse guided ships into the sound; while Fort Casey with it’s large guns protected the sound. The setting has a sweeping view of the water and across it to the Olympic Mountain Range on the Olympic Peninsula. The lighthouse was put into operation in 1861, rebuilt and moved slightly north to accommodate the guns of Fort Casey in 1903 and ultimately decommissioned in 1922. It was acquired and reopened by Washington State Parks in the mid 1950’s.

For this print, I went black and white to capture not only the mood of the day (rain and sun with heavy rain clouds moving in), but the contrast within the structure itself and the natural setting surrounding it. I shoot my photographs in RAW, which gives me the flexibility to use strong detail and the ability to adjust the many elements of a picture. With this shot, I went for maximum detail and played with the contrast and lighting to create the end result. The final art print does a great job capturing the look and feel of our visit to the lighthouse that day. Thoughts?

 

 

I invite you to come into the gallery to view the addition of new art prints to the collection in Black and White Photography One.

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West Point Lighthouse – Excerpts From a Photo Shoot

As I promised last week, I would be sharing some more lighthouses from the photo shoot I did around Puget Sound in September. This week, I wanted to share the West Point Lighthouse, which is also known as the Discovery Park Lighthouse.

This lighthouse was opened in 1881 and sits on a point of land that juts into the Puget Sound and marks the northern extent of Elliot Bay. Elliot Bay is the immediate waterfront that Seattle was founded on. It actually was the first manned lighthouse on Puget Sound. Access is via Discovery Park, which has restricted parking, and it is a little bit of a hike to get up to the lighthouse. Once there, you are able to walk around the grounds and get shots from a number of angles. My goal on a shoot like this is to capture the structure from as many different aspects as I can physically get. I got a number of shots and have posted what I think are the best five, each from a slightly different perspective.

West Point Lighthouse 1

West Point Lighthouse 1

The first shot is from the trail as you come up to the property. I like the composition of this shot as it portrays the isolation of the lighthouse with the added element of a large cargo ship on Puget Sound in the background.

 

West Point Lighthouse 2

West Point Lighthouse 2

This next shot is a little closer to the lighthouse and is framed to focus on just the structure while still keeping enough of the surrounding landscape to complete the scene.

 

West Point Lighthouse 3

West Point Lighthouse 3

The third shot is focused solely on the architecture of the lighthouse with just a hint of the landscape surrounding the building.

West Point Lighthouse 4

West Point Lighthouse 4

The fourth shot is from a slightly different angle and closer to the structure. This perspective created a different element of depth and architectural shape. Having seen the building in the other shots, you know that it is a long structure with the light in the middle. This shot gives you a different perspective, defining more shape and geometry of the building.

West Point Lighthouse 5

The fifth and last shot taken just a few feet from number four, gives you a completely different view of the building. You now see an entry door at the end of the building. From this perspective, the building looks very small, as you really don’t see the length. With this side in the shade, it gives a different look to the many architectural elements of the building.

So, my question to you is: “Which is your favorite shot?” I will be using only two, three at the most to add to my Color Photography Gallery. Thoughts?

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Mukilteo Lighthouse – Excerpts from a Photo Shoot

I think it is so important to listen to that little voice in your head when it shouts out to you, especially when you are doing a photo shoot and looking for good shots.  For me it typically is out of the corner of my eye and the voice makes me stop and re-look again for a full view. This time the scene was in full view, but I was comfortably seated in a car on a ferry and didn’t want to fight the elements.

Last month when we were up in the Seattle area, we took a day for me to go around the Puget Sound and do a photo shoot of lighthouses. I have photographed most of the lighthouses from Northern California through Oregon into Southern Washington, but none around the Puget Sound.  What a great day. My daughter and her boyfriend hosted the event so all my wife and I had to do was sit back, relax and enjoy the scenery. The weather was a complete mix of beautiful sunshine to pouring rain. Loved it!!

We started in the Seattle area and worked our way north before returning south again. I will feature a couple more over the next few weeks, but wanted to start with our last one, the Mukilteo Lighthouse. You never know when and where opportunity will come for some great shots, so always listen to that little voice in your head.

We had just been on Widbey Island and were taking a ferry back to the mainland, which happens to be Mukilteo, Washington. The ferry ride wasn’t very long, so most people stayed in their cars, as did we. We were the third car back from the front to drive off and had a great view out the front. That great view became of the rain and water and then pouring rain, wind and water. Frankly we couldn’t see any land until we got close to docking.  As we pulled into the little harbor, I saw the lighthouse and realized that we were going to be docking right next door. Something in my head said get out and take shots now. I then had this quick internal discussion between weather and comfort, but I trust the voice, so got out of the car and went closer to the opening. This is where I remind you wind was blowing the rain into the ferry and the boat was making its final turns and lurches preparing to dock. I knew I wouldn’t have much time, so I just went for it. I am so glad I did…my best shots were from the ferry as it was coming along side of the lighthouse. The perspective I got from that angle was so different than from the landside. (Please note: none of these shots have been cleaned up or cropped…. you are seeing them as they as they are…for final presentation I will level some out and crop for composition)

Mukilteo Lighthouse 1

Mukilteo Lighthouse 1

This is part of the series I took on the ferry showing the two caretakers homes and the lighthouse in the middle.

Mukilteo Lighthouse 2

Mukilteo Lighthouse 2

This one is a little closer showing the one caretaker home and the lighthouse. Notice the blur of ferry portal wall on the lower left side and the slight angle of the shot needing straightened…back to my comment about not having cropped these shots yet.

Mukilteo Lighthouse 3

Mukilteo Lighthouse 3

I used a little zoom as we started docking and caught the light just as it was shining on us.

As we drove off the ferry and pulled into the parking lot for the lighthouse, the heavens opened even more. I told everyone that I thought I got some good shots and lets not worry about it. My daughter’s boyfriend wasn’t having any of it…he got the umbrella and said let’s do it…I’ll cover you. My wife and daughter at this point weren’t leaving the warm dry comfort of the car.

Mukilteo Lighthouse 4

Mukilteo Lighthouse 4

So here we are two guys with one umbrella and a camera running around the grounds of the lighthouse and caretakers cottages getting some good shots in the pouring rain. In this shot, you can see the ferry in the background. The thing that amazed me the most was the size of the lighthouse; it looks like a dollhouse. I didn’t realize it when I was shooting from the ferry, because the other two buildings were seen at such an angle with the lighthouse it all looked as one. I did get some good shots with my umbrella assistant, but really like the others more. Reinforced lesson; always listen to that little voice in your head. Thoughts?

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