Tag Archives: Issaquah Railroad Station Museum

The Caboose and Train Station Platform – Black and White Sketches

Anyone that has been following my work, knows I have an affinity to black and white photography. As I have stated before, I began serious photography with black and white film and had access to a dark room to develop my own prints. The mood, contrast and elements that become center stage in a photograph is different when seen in black and white versus the same shot in color. With these prints I have taken that look one step further with a pencil sketching technique. Using a sketched look versus the original photograph gives the final print a softer more rustic feel.

 

For this post I chose two sketches I created from the Issaquah Train Station (now a museum in Issaquah, Washington). I have featured numerous prints from this location as it lent itself to so many opportunities.

I love these old baggage carts sitting on the platform.

Thoughts?

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Issaquah Train Station – Featured Art Print

Issaquah Train Station – from my Color Photography Gallery is a color photograph wall art print of train tracks running in front of the Issaquah, Washington train station. The setting is Issaquah, Washington during the fall color changes. The amount of trees throughout this eastern suburb of Seattle that turn vibrant colors in the autumn is spectacular. The brilliance of this autumn display becomes the focal point this time of year with the natural pines that cover the mountain slopes nearby as a steady green backdrop.

Since I shoot in RAW format, I was able to sharpen and deepen the contrast and details to give this shot strong depth throughout the entire frame. I love pictures that take a subject and visually follow it into “infinity” such as the tracks in this shot! Thoughts?


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A Bright Yellow Caboose – Featured Art Print

This week, I wanted to feature an art print that shouts out with bold color, titled; A Bright Yellow Caboose!!! Talk about bright and talk about yellow!!

To create this art print, I used a fauvism style oil technique. This technique uses bold brush strokes, abstract shapes and surreal colors, creating a very contemporary look. This particular wall art print depicts a yellow caboose located on the grounds of the Issaquah Depot Museum, a preservation of a piece of important history in this part of the Pacific Northwest.

 

The setting is Issaquah, Washington and the Issaquah Depot Museum. Using some license with this bright colored abstract piece, my goal was to depict a yellow caboose sitting on the track at the station. The Issaquah train station was an important stop along the railroad route from downtown Seattle to the mountain towns in the Cascades. Issaquah sits in the foothills of the Cascade Mountain Range and is now an eastern suburb of the Seattle metropolitan area. The train station has been refurbished and now sits as a museum along the abandoned tracks it once served. Thoughts?

I invite you to visit my Architecture Gallery to enjoy this print and many more.

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Sepia Photography – Featured Art Prints

My featured Art Print this week is actually four of them from my Sepia Photography Gallery. They are: “ Logging Tools” – “Mine Cart” – “Wagon Wheel Hub” and “Cedar Rapids Barn”. I’m featuring four prints to illustrate some examples of the type of shots I think make good sepia tone photographs.

Dating back to the 1880’s, sepia toning was a chemical change used on black and white photographs to give them a warmer look and to enhance the archival qualities. Today, we associate the look with old historic photographs. With the advent of digital photo manipulation, it is very easy to recreate that look on any photograph. I use it to support a look that I associate with the tone as being old, historic and rustic. The type of subject matter that I convert to a sepia tone fits into that category and is what comprises my Sepia Photography Gallery.

My first example is from the Issaquah, Washington Railroad Depot Museum, which was built in 1889. This particular train station was an important stop between the mountain towns in the Cascades and Seattle. Issaquah became a point of export for timber, thus the example of tools used to handle the transportation of timber. By it’s very nature, this shot depicts elements dating back to the time of sepia, so it seems pretty natural to show it with those tones.

The next photograph is from the same museum, but depicts a different industry that the area was well-known for; mining. This is another obvious use of the sepia tone to create that old rustic look.

The third shot is an old west wagon wheel I found as part of the ambience for shops set up like an old west town in Cave Creek, Arizona. Again, this seems obvious due to the historic factor of the subject matter.

The last shot is an old barn I found by accident in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. In an area on the outskirts where large homes with multiple acres of land have taken over, I saw this barn out of the corner of my eye off the main road behind some trees. Doing my usual, I processed what I think I saw in a short flash, found a place to turn around and drove back to where I had spotted it. It was a short hike through the trees, but I got some great shots. The barn isn’t as old as the use of sepia tones, but due to the condition of the building, I liked the look that this tone gave it.

Maybe these shots seemed like obvious subject matter, but not everything that is “obvious” really looks good in a sepia tone. I think the tone enhanced the look of these subjects and made the final print more interesting. Sepia, just like black and white photography has to have elements of contrast and lines to make a photograph “pop”. The other interesting aspect of this type of art print is how it has been used in interior decor. I have been surprised to see a number of these “old rustic” shots used in more contemporary interior design where warm earth tones are important elements to the overall look. So much of the final look depends on the matting and framing. Thoughts?

 

I invite you to come into the gallery to view the addition of new art prints to the collection in Sepia Photography Gallery

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Railroad Tracks and The House – Featured Art Print

As promised last week, here is the sister print to “Picnic Table by the Tracks”. This art print is titled: “ Railroad Tracks and The House” and both are from my Landscape Oil Gallery.

This print is also done using an impasto oil technique. As with last weeks, this style uses large brush strokes and bright, bold colors. Both elements seem appropriate for this print to make the setting really pop with color and texture. The setting is the same row of trees as in last weeks picture, but the angle has changed and so has the subject matter of the print. The color of the turning leaves grabs your eye with the vibrant oranges and yellows. The railroad tracks are still a central theme, but in this view, we see them run parallel to the row of trees very close to a house. In this perspective you see the tracks go way off into the distance creating that depth I like. I love fall colors and I love a picture that pulls me in. The questions arise from looking at this scene. Where does the track go? Why is it so close to a house? Who would live in a house with a railroad track that close?

Some answers to the questions these prints bring up:

  1. The tracks are abandoned and lead to historic downtown Issaquah and what is now a Train Depot Museum, but what was once a passenger and freight depot serving this area. This was one of many stops between downtown Seattle and the mountain towns in the Cascade Range just to the east of Issaquah. The train service and tracks date back to 1889 and were used up until the 1940’s. Today the depot is listed in the National Register of historic places.
  2. The house doesn’t look like it dates back that far, maybe the 40’s or 50’s and may have been built after the tracks were abandoned; I’m really not sure. The house is currently used as the home of the Issaquah Chamber of Commerce and the picnic table from last weeks art print is in the back yard of the Chamber of Commerce. I would assume employees use it during nice weather.

So, the mystery of the tracks themselves is solved. The house and closeness to the tracks still remains a mystery to me, but the tracks as you can tell follow a straight line and parallel an existing road. I felt very lucky the day I did the original photo-shoot that started this process, to not only get the fall leaves near their peak, but to capture some interesting elements into a couple of art prints. Thoughts?

I invite you to come into the gallery to view the collection in Landscape Oil

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Train Carts – Featured Art Print

 

“Train Carts” is the art print I wanted to feature today from my Architecture Collection.  The print is of old train carts that had been used at the Issaquah Train Station to load and unload luggage and packages from the trains stopping on their run from Seattle to the mountain towns in the Cascades. The style I used on this print is an impasto oil technique that emphasizes bold brush strokes and bright colors. The bold brush strokes create texture and dimension to the print. The bright colors reinforce the red of the building and the color of the carts, which match the trim of the station. The station is now a museum with an abundance of historical items for viewing that I have featured on prior posts. It is kept in pristine condition to reflect the time when it was a busy transportation hub for this town nestled in the foothills of the Cascade Mountain range just east of Seattle. I loved the setting and have used it for many prints, from the train station itself to the yellow caboose on the tracks and now these old carts. There is a lot of history in this one setting and I can just imagine the amount of activity that once went through here. No detail has been left to chance in the way this museum has been refurbished to reflect its heyday. Looking at this print, you can almost imagine the carts getting pulled over across the platform for the arrival of the next train. Take a journey back in time and enjoy the print!

I invite you to come into the gallery to view the collection in Architecture.

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