Tag Archives: historical landmarks

Fort Casey – Excerpts from a Photo Shoot

I am continuing with my sharing of photography I did when I was up in the Seattle area in September. Today, I have attached 9 shots I took of Fort Casey on Whidbey Island. I think these shots are great examples of how to create a story through photography. Most of these shots are architecturally oriented and when shooting this type of element, I look for interesting angles or framing opportunities to create a unique visual experience while still trying to relay the look and feel of the subject.

So lets talk about Fort Casey so you know what you are looking at. Today it is a 467-acre state park that houses the remnants of the physical fort and guns along with Admiralty Head Lighthouse. Fort Casey was part of a trio of forts that were built to protect the Puget Sound from invasion by sea. They were called the Triangle of Fire and were known for their big guns that had disappearing carriages that could be lowered for protection and then raised to fire. Building started in 1897 and the forts became obsolete with the invention of the airplane (they weren’t designed against air attack) and the modernization of battleships.

Fort Casey 1

Fort Casey 1

In the first shot, you get a perspective of how the fort sits above the entrance to the Puget Sound.

Fort Casey 2

Fort Casey 2

The second shot gives you an idea of the structures that were created to house the big guns that sat on their disappearing carriages (the structure to the right), with the separate towers to the left, I would assume for a visual over the guns and protection against return fire.

Fort Casey 3

Fort Casey 3

The third shot shows the top of the Admiralty Head Lighthouse just north of the fort. The view would be from shot 2 and turning around.

Fort Casey 4

Fort Casey 4

The fourth shot is more of the same front building, but showing one of the big guns.

Fort Casey 5

Fort Casey 5

The fifth shot shows a close up of the big gun with my lovely wife in the picture for a perspective of sheer size of the guns (yes, she has no idea she is now part of a blog 🙂 ).

Fort Casey 6

Fort Casey 6

The sixth shot shows more of the building. You can actually go into the bunkers and wander around. Most of them interconnect underground and I assume that’s for protection during an attack.

Fort Casey 7

Fort Casey 7

The seventh shot shows more of the structure. One of the platforms for the carriage of the big guns is just out of sight in the top left, but shown in the next picture.

Fort Casey 8

Fort Casey 8

The eighth shot is one of the platforms supporting the carriages for the big guns.

Fort Casey 9

Fort Casey 9

The ninth shot shows a group of buildings just a bit further inland and slightly up hill from the main bunkers.

The entire experience was fascinating and I had no idea this type of bunker had been built in that era along the Puget Sound. Thoughts?

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Two Bougainvillea Vines

The tale of two Bougainvillea vines began about three weeks ago from a simple request.  A client had contacted me looking for an art print that had a Spanish element to it. This particular client has purchased a number of my art prints over the last couple years and I have done some custom work for her, so she knew if I didn’t have exactly what she was looking for, I could probably create it. After further discussion to understand the look she was going for, I directed her to a couple of different prints to see if those would work. What she liked is the first attachment.

The setting for this scene is the grounds of the Alamo in San Antonio, Texas. This structure is off in a corner of the grounds. I’m really not sure what it is used for as there wasn’t access into it and it is somewhat off the beaten path. I love the historic architecture of it as it has the old adobe homestead look found throughout the southwest and west from the Spanish influence. This particular print is done using a classic watercolor technique.

Now this is the part where the Bougainvillea’s come into it. “Kirt, my husband and I love this print, but wanted to know if you could put some Bougainvillea vines on the front two posts to add a pop of color?” With the help of Photoshop, not a problem. I started scouring my portfolio for Bougainvillea and remembered I had just finished some prints with them from my Cave Creek, Arizona shoot.   It isn’t quite as easy as tracing the plant and doing a cut and paste to get it to look like it had grown on the post. It’s a fair amount of trial and error and in my case, a lot of piece meal. I would take portions of the plant and with each piece create a new vine growing up each post. The following is the final product also done in the classic watercolor technique.

The Alamo Adobe with Bougainvillea

The Alamo Adobe with Bougainvillea

I like both of them for different reasons….I like the subtle, clean look of the original, but I also like the pop of color in the final one. Thoughts?

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A Photo Shoot: The Old Railroad Station

I was doing a photo shoot of the fall colors around town when I found myself at the Issaquah Historical Train Station. Not one to miss an opportunity for pictures, I wanted to share some of the shots I got that day in their “raw” form…before I have turned them into black and white or sepia prints or paintings.

The train station was originally built in 1889. It was bought by the city of Issaquah in 1984 for restoration by the historical society. It was listed on the National Register of Historic sites in 1990 and the refurbished train depot was dedicated as a museum in June of 1994. Actual train service over the years included passenger service between Seattle and North Bend. The tracks were eventually abandoned and the right of way given to the county for conversion into their trail system.

Issaquah Railroad Depot

Issaquah Railroad Station

Station Platform

Station Platform

Logging Equipment

Logging Equipment

Actual displays of some of the logging machinery and the tools that were used.

Example of Tools

Example of Tools

I have played around with these shots of the tools already and they will end up in my gallery as Sepia Art Prints….

Last but not least…

The Yellow Car

The Yellow Car

A lot of history and the facility is kept very much up to date. It was a great photo opportunity, but more importantly a great example of the Issaquah Historical Societies work at keeping the heritage of  the region fresh for following generations to remember. Since Issaquah is now part of the greater Seattle metropolitan area, it wouldn’t be hard to forget that it once was the gateway to the Cascades and a travel point of passengers and logging materials going up and down the mountains.

Thoughts? Comments?

These photographs will be available shortly in my Color Photography Gallery.

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