Tag Archives: grand canyon

Colorful Arizona – Featured Art Prints

This week I wanted to feature two prints that highlight the colors of Arizona. Both scenes say “Arizona” because of the subject matter, but I wanted to highlight the colorful beauty that is seen in each of these locations. I used a fauvism technique (if you follow my blog and/or work, you are familiar with my use of this technique to create a somewhat colorful and abstract look) to highlight the tones and hues that nature provides.

The first print is the Grand Canyon. I used a lookout point as a portion of the foreground to add dimension and drama to the scene. You get a true sense of depth looking from the foreground out across the canyon. The ribbons of color from the different layers of rock strata are accentuated via bright colors and the bold brush strokes.

The second print features a saguaro cactus native to the Sonoran Desert in Arizona and the state of Sonora in Mexico. The sky becomes the colorful focal point in this print as either a sunrise or sunset can light up the desert with bright, vidid colors. Again, the strong brush strokes accent the colorful sky with a typical desert setting in the foreground.

Thoughts?

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Grand Canyon Storms – Featured Art Print

Grand Canyon Storms is a color photograph wall art print of the Grand Canyon.

The setting is the South Rim of the Grand Canyon during summer monsoon season. The storms build quickly and create a dramatic visual effect across the wide expanse of the Grand Canyon.

The usage of color photography as a wall art print lends itself to many different types of interior design, from contemporary to traditional. I think what dictates the look is the subject matter of the photograph and the manner in which it is framed and matted.


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Grand Canyon Sketched – Featured Art Prints

I have been working with some of the shots I took at the Grand Canyon in early August (The Grand Canyon – Excerpts From a Photo Shoot) and am attaching five art prints I created that I just added to my Landscape Watercolor Gallery. I created these art prints with a sketching/watercolor technique that creates a very detailed sketched look with soft colors. The overall look is soft and subtle, but when you really look into the print you see detail you don’t initially notice at first. This is the appeal these have as it relates to art prints of the Grand Canyon. The overall beauty and look is overwhelmingly breathtaking and larger than life. Man pales by comparison when presented alongside this type of setting. Let’s take a look at them….


 

The first print gives you a partial panorama, with the foreground on the left, which is the canyon facing side of Lookout Studio. Your eyes are drawn into the detail and you see people in the sketch. The more your eye is drawn into the print, you start to see just how many people. This type of detail doesn’t distract from the overall look, but actually compliments the look I was going for.

 


 

The second print gives you a sense of depth, with the purple sketching in the background creating the canyon’s distance and depth. The overlook creates a great foreground focal point and then again, you start to see the people. They are small in comparison to the overall scene, but become an important part of the small detail.


 

With the third print, the overlook in the foreground becomes the prominent element of the print with the people milling about. In this art print, the canyon depth takes backstage to the beauty of the rock strata and the people on the overlook.


 

The fourth art print focuses on the rock strata of the South Rim and the Grand Canyon Village is almost an “oh, there is something there” as your eye sweeps the scene. Once you realize the village is there, you start to see the small detail of buildings and people.


 

The fifth and final art print is the El Tovar Lodge. I love the architecture of the building as it sits atop the South Rim.


 

My objective with these prints was to portray the beauty and scope of this natural wonder and present prints that demonstrate the sheer size of the setting versus man. Thoughts?


 

I invite you to visit my Landscape Watercolor Gallery to enjoy these prints and many more.

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Natural Stone as Architectural Elements – Excerpts from a Photo Shoot

In photography, I have a fascination with capturing interesting architectural elements. I like to create unusual perspectives to highlight form and lines of different structures. In going through my Grand Canyon portfolio, I pulled some of the shots I took of different buildings that interested me that weekend. I saw a pattern of a specific element that kept drawing my eye to each of these buildings without even realizing it at the time. Each of the buildings I photographed, were made with natural rock exterior walls. The rock in each case is obviously indigenous to the area and used to create some very interesting looks. I have attached 9 pictures that I thought were great examples of what I saw.

Rock Architecture One

Rock Architecture One

The first capture shows the front tower of the municipal courthouse in Flagstaff, Arizona. The overall building sits back from a downtown street corner, creating an almost park like setting. This angle gives you a perspective of the scope of the structure. This type of façade is not uncommon for the period in which it was built and with the refined finished rock, it creates a very imposing and strong look for this courthouse.

Rock Architecture Two

Rock Architecture Two

The second shot is the artist in me, framing the architectural lines and elements in a unique fashion that highlights the beauty of the stone. The presentation depicts the detail used in this regal structure.

Rock Architecture Three

Rock Architecture Three

The third picture takes us up to a building close to where we parked in the Grand Canyon Village. I truly couldn’t figure out what it was being used for as it was off the beaten path in an area that housed support and maintenance buildings. I was blown away by the sheer scope of the irregular rock used to create the outer wall of this structure. This shot of the corner also shows the massive timber beams used to create the roof.

Rock Architecture Four

Rock Architecture Four

This fourth shot, shows the size of some of the windows outlined with that natural rough rock wall.

Rock Architecture Five

Rock Architecture Five

The fifth shot of the same building shows an exterior stairwell wrapping around the corner. Again, the unique aspect of the rock exterior wall creates interesting pictures.

Rock Architecture Six

Rock Architecture Six

Capture number six takes us back to the rim of the Grand Canyon. I zoomed in on a shot similar to one I used last week to highlight the Lookout Studio and show the exterior rock wall of this structure. It blends into the cliff in a very natural way.

Rock Architecture Seven

Rock Architecture Seven

Number seven is of the Hopi House located at the other end of the village from the Lookout Studio. This structure was built using a Pueblo style of architecture. The rock in this structure is totally different from the other ones and creates a look that compliments the Pueblo style. I love the detail work with each individual stone.

Rock Architecture Eight

Rock Architecture Eight

Number eight focuses on the different levels of the building and the unique design of outdoor space on each level.

Rock Architecture Nine

Rock Architecture Nine

Finishing with number nine, another angle of the Hopi House, showing the ladders connecting the different levels of this Pueblo style structure. I am so use to seeing this type of structure done with an adobe finish and found this natural stone look very appealing.

Just some captures of natural stone structures from our weekend outing…thoughts?

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The Grand Canyon – Excerpts From a Photo Shoot

A couple of weeks ago, we took a long weekend and spent it in Flagstaff, Arizona (just a few hours up the road from us) and Grand Canyon National Park (the Grand Canyon). Today’s photos come from the series I took at the Grand Canyon.

The Grand Canyon is one of the most photographed natural wonders of the world, so what could I possibly do differently to create some interesting captures. What I decided to attempt, was to stick with the natural elements of this natural wonder and present them in a slightly different perspective (not that this hasn’t been done, but my approach hasn’t been presented as frequently). For anyone that hasn’t visited the park, the view is breathtaking and over-whelming at the same time. The colors and shapes are incredible, but the size, depth and scope of what you are looking at boggles the mind. I decided to break it down into captures that focused on highlighting depth. I love creating that sense of depth in a picture, so what more natural thing to do when it’s all but handed to you. Kind of obvious, but the presentation I wanted for each shot was a strong foreground that was decidedly distant from the background.

Grand Canyon 1

Grand Canyon 1

The first shot gives you the idea of what I am talking about. The foreground is on the left side of the frame. I love the building nestled at the top of the lookout point and the people viewing the canyon. Even the clouds have shape, texture and depth.

Grand Canyon 2

Grand Canyon 2

This second capture, zooms in on the same spot for a slightly different perspective. The foreground becomes the prominent feature with the people walking around the lookout point, yet we still have an obvious background that is large and distant in scale.

Grand Canyon 3

Grand Canyon 3

The third photo takes another lookout point that juts out from the rim. In this one, I have a hint of trees from where I am standing as the immediate foreground (I am shooting across a very deep ravine), yet the lookout point stays as the main foreground, with the canyon as the background creating the sense of immense depth to this shot.

Grand Canyon 4

Grand Canyon 4

The fourth shot is of two lookout points. The one in the foreground has the most people walking around, but then you realize the rock strata to the right of that is actually another lookout point further back, which the fifth shot zooms in on.

 

Grand Canyon 5

Grand Canyon 5

In this capture, you see the people on the point and this angle is looking down the canyon, not across it as is evident by the coloring (air is hazier and bluer because of the distance).

Grand Canyon 6

Grand Canyon 6

Lookout points are an easy way to capture the obvious levels of depth, but for my last two, I used a slightly different approach. In the 6th capture, I have two light color rock structures in the foreground and a red colored rock strata in what could be called the background, but behind that is the canyon creating another focal point of depth (three distinct elements of depth).

Grand Canyon 6

Grand Canyon 6

The last photo looks down into the canyon. I framed just one area of erosion that is laced with a trail taking you all the way down to the Colorado River, which can just barely be seen below and right of center. This angle pulls your eye down through the various layers and levels towards the river.

In your opinion, was I able to create a series of pictures that portrayed visual depth, giving you a feel for the shear size of the subject matter in an interesting way? What are your thoughts?

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