Tag Archives: carriage

Cave Creek, Arizona – Excerpts from a Photo Shoot

Cave Creek 1

Cave Creek 1

The excerpts from a photo shoot I want to share today are from Cave Creek, Arizona. Cave Creek is located in the extreme northern end of the Phoenix metropolitan area and has become an extremely popular destination for tourist. Keeping the spirit of the “Old West” alive, the town has the look and feel of those days gone by.

I have attached four shots out of 90 that I took and they all come from a re-created old west town that today serves as shops for tourists. There are numerous carriages and wagons lining the main street next to the wooden walkways typical for an old western town. For a photographer, it’s a dream come true for creating old west art prints and photographs.

The first photograph is of a courtyard located towards the back of the town right off of main street. I like the look of the fountain and took a couple of shots to see what I would get.

The composition of the next shot gives you an idea of just how much “Old West” items are around this town. There are wooden wagon wheels everywhere and I loved the old outhouse at the end of the street.

Cave Creek 2

Cave Creek 2

The third photograph shows some of the shops and the wooden walkway with a carriage in front.

 

Cave Creek 3

Cave Creek 3

The fourth and final capture shows a replica of a Native American Indian teepee. The keynote here is replica, as an actual teepee (or tipi) was constructed of animal skins and was without wooden floors for ease of mobility.

Cave Creek 4

Cave Creek 4

 

I haven’t decided what I will do with these particular photographs, but wanted to share them. What I usually do after a photo shoot is take a quick inventory of the results to see what I am interested in doing something with. In this particular case, I was getting ready to update my Sepia Photography Collection, so that was foremost on my mind with this subject matter. I pulled a few of the shots and added them to that collection. The rest of them, I will sit on and go back to them at a later date to see what I visualize at that time. Most of my painting prints come from that process of waiting and then revisiting. Thoughts?

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What Makes a Black and White Photograph an Art Print? Part 1

What are the elements in a black and white photograph that make it an art print? There are numerous aspects to a shot that elevate it from just a photograph to an art print. I’ve decided to focus on three elements in part 1 and then three more in part 2.

The three elements I want to address are:

1.   Composition

2.   Depth

3.   Lines and Details

Using an art print “The Back of a Carriage” from my Black and White Photography 2 Collection as an example, lets take a look at each of those elements.

Composition

Simply put, the composition of a picture is the subject matter and the way you have displayed it in the picture. The subject matter could be numerous objects or a single object. How have you “composed” the picture to create a visual story. Looking at the example, this a singular subject and they way I composed the shot focuses in on the back part of an old carriage. In this case the composition is very specific and intentional to an area of the carriage.

Depth

The depth of a shot is important because it allows your eye to see additional dimensions and keeps the subject matter from being flat. Depth should allow the eye to see past the focal point, but pull back to it naturally. With the featured art print, you get a sense of depth as your eye looks past the back wheels to the front wheels which are slightly out of focus and then beyond to the street and the walkway across the street which are blurred. Your eye naturally comes back to the portion of the shot that is in focus.

Lines and Detail

I look for strong lines and intriguing details that I know will be highlighted by the black and white tones. The strong lines are the most obvious in this example as the back of the seat, leaf spring, axle and wheels are very defined shapes. An example of intriguing details would be a landscape where leaves on a tree are lost in a color version, but pop out in black and white. Losing the strong colors allows the shades of gray to bring out detail.

In the featured art print, “The Back of a Carriage” has a unique composition that immediately creates a story and pulls the eye in with interest. The depth keeps the interest as the eye scans the print and comes back to the focal point. The lines of the subject stand out as darker grays and pulls the visual immediately to the subject matter. The details within those lines add a level of interest as you explore them. Instead of being a flat, monotone, uninteresting photograph, you have an art print ready for framing and display.

Thoughts?

I invite you to come into the gallery to view the new additions to the collection in the Black and White Gallery 2.

Please visit my main gallery: TheWallGallery (All domestic orders over $60.00 – free shipping!)

Follow my work:

Facebook: TheWallGallery by Kirt Tisdale. (Page likes are always appreciated!)

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