Tag Archives: buildings

Getting Non-Linear With Urban High-Rises – Featured Art Prints

Anyone who has been following my work, knows I have a fascination with architecture. I did start studying architecture in high school and always thought I would go to some architectural school, etc. etc. etc. Problem was my parents both worked for a private four-year liberal arts college in Iowa which is where all of my siblings and I ended up going (could be the deal on tuition costs for dependents of employees of the college – four of us so you do the math). I ended up with a major in business which to me seemed the most practical. Having said all of that, it was that same school where I was introduced to photography and dark rooms which ultimately led to the things you see here. OK, so that explains my fascination with architecture and why you see a lot of it in my work. Today I wanted to show an interesting mix between that love of architecture and creative artistic presentation. I have done a number of shots of urban high-rises which of course are very linear and rise into the sky in very straight lines. Mixing the fauvism style and technique which presents non-linear and abstract looks to subjects with urban structures results in the attached two art prints. Both prints create an abstract and playful approach to rigid downtown buildings (Seattle in both cases).

 

 

Thoughts?

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Natural Stone as Architectural Elements – Excerpts from a Photo Shoot

In photography, I have a fascination with capturing interesting architectural elements. I like to create unusual perspectives to highlight form and lines of different structures. In going through my Grand Canyon portfolio, I pulled some of the shots I took of different buildings that interested me that weekend. I saw a pattern of a specific element that kept drawing my eye to each of these buildings without even realizing it at the time. Each of the buildings I photographed, were made with natural rock exterior walls. The rock in each case is obviously indigenous to the area and used to create some very interesting looks. I have attached 9 pictures that I thought were great examples of what I saw.

Rock Architecture One

Rock Architecture One

The first capture shows the front tower of the municipal courthouse in Flagstaff, Arizona. The overall building sits back from a downtown street corner, creating an almost park like setting. This angle gives you a perspective of the scope of the structure. This type of façade is not uncommon for the period in which it was built and with the refined finished rock, it creates a very imposing and strong look for this courthouse.

Rock Architecture Two

Rock Architecture Two

The second shot is the artist in me, framing the architectural lines and elements in a unique fashion that highlights the beauty of the stone. The presentation depicts the detail used in this regal structure.

Rock Architecture Three

Rock Architecture Three

The third picture takes us up to a building close to where we parked in the Grand Canyon Village. I truly couldn’t figure out what it was being used for as it was off the beaten path in an area that housed support and maintenance buildings. I was blown away by the sheer scope of the irregular rock used to create the outer wall of this structure. This shot of the corner also shows the massive timber beams used to create the roof.

Rock Architecture Four

Rock Architecture Four

This fourth shot, shows the size of some of the windows outlined with that natural rough rock wall.

Rock Architecture Five

Rock Architecture Five

The fifth shot of the same building shows an exterior stairwell wrapping around the corner. Again, the unique aspect of the rock exterior wall creates interesting pictures.

Rock Architecture Six

Rock Architecture Six

Capture number six takes us back to the rim of the Grand Canyon. I zoomed in on a shot similar to one I used last week to highlight the Lookout Studio and show the exterior rock wall of this structure. It blends into the cliff in a very natural way.

Rock Architecture Seven

Rock Architecture Seven

Number seven is of the Hopi House located at the other end of the village from the Lookout Studio. This structure was built using a Pueblo style of architecture. The rock in this structure is totally different from the other ones and creates a look that compliments the Pueblo style. I love the detail work with each individual stone.

Rock Architecture Eight

Rock Architecture Eight

Number eight focuses on the different levels of the building and the unique design of outdoor space on each level.

Rock Architecture Nine

Rock Architecture Nine

Finishing with number nine, another angle of the Hopi House, showing the ladders connecting the different levels of this Pueblo style structure. I am so use to seeing this type of structure done with an adobe finish and found this natural stone look very appealing.

Just some captures of natural stone structures from our weekend outing…thoughts?

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Urban Cluster – Featured Art Print

“Urban Cluster” is the art print I wanted to feature today from my Cityscapes Collection.  The print is a group of high-rise buildings in downtown San Diego. The style I used on this print is a sketching technique that emphasizes the linear aspect of the group of buildings.

This particular print had its birth in a project I was doing for a San Diego based company. I was doing a full day shoot around the core areas of San Diego. My shoot took me along the bay in downtown San Diego, then across the bay on Coronado Island. From Coronado, I used my telephoto lens to shoot the skyline of downtown. In the middle of all of those shots, I found this particular scene. Although I never used it for the project, I was pulled to it seeing some elements I liked. After cropping the shot tighter and squaring it, I found the look I was after. I then played with a technique giving it a sketched appearance with watercolors. I liked the result as it highlights the straight lines and sharp points of the architecture in each of the buildings. It’s a group of five buildings caught at such an angle that they look grouped together. In reality, they are not. The buildings in the forefront are about a block apart from each other and the pointed building in the background is at least a half a mile away along with the high-rise condo on the extreme left. The use of a telephoto lens creates an interesting element in the depth perception as it pulls the background in closer, especially in a tight shot like this. Thoughts?

I invite you to come into the gallery to view the collection in Cityscapes.

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