Tag Archives: architectural elements

The Door of What? Spanish Colonial Revival

 

Can you guess what type of building this door is on?

I wanted to share a photograph from a shoot I did in 2017. I was in the area of this door the other day and remembered I had done a photoshoot of the building a few years back, so I went digging through my archives and found the shoot. I had done the shoot as a spur of the moment thing while I was out doing another shoot. The other shoot that I was focused on at the time took me by this location and I thought I should capture the unique architectural details of this structure.

From this shoot, I narrowed everything down to this particular capture as it speaks volumes of architectural details and anyone who has been following my work, knows I love unique styles and details on buildings. The structure was built in 1924 in a romantic Spanish Colonial Revival style. The building was then sold to the current owner in 1989. I love this door and the unique detail is so beautiful. I have passed through this facility numerous times over the last 20+ years and always admired the beauty of this main door.

Figure it out? It’s the main door to the Glendale, California Train Station. The station is the first stop heading north out of Union Station (another beautiful building) in downtown Los Angeles. The station serves the Amtrak Surfliner (runs north and south numerous times daily from downtown San Diego in the south and ultimately San Francisco to the north. The station also serves numerous Metrolink (Los Angeles metropolitan area commuter trains) running north into the San Fernando Valley and south into Los Angeles Union Station for additional connections.

The original facility was built by Southern Pacific Railroad and sold to the city of Glendale in 1989. For additional information from Wikipedia, click HERE!

Thoughts?

Please visit my main gallery: TheWallGallery (All domestic orders over $50.00 – free shipping!)

Follow my work:

Facebook: TheWallGallery by Kirt Tisdale. (Page likes are always appreciated!)

Twitter: KirtWallGallery

Instagram: Kirttisdale

Natural Stone as Architectural Elements – Excerpts from a Photo Shoot

In photography, I have a fascination with capturing interesting architectural elements. I like to create unusual perspectives to highlight form and lines of different structures. In going through my Grand Canyon portfolio, I pulled some of the shots I took of different buildings that interested me that weekend. I saw a pattern of a specific element that kept drawing my eye to each of these buildings without even realizing it at the time. Each of the buildings I photographed, were made with natural rock exterior walls. The rock in each case is obviously indigenous to the area and used to create some very interesting looks. I have attached 9 pictures that I thought were great examples of what I saw.

Rock Architecture One

Rock Architecture One

The first capture shows the front tower of the municipal courthouse in Flagstaff, Arizona. The overall building sits back from a downtown street corner, creating an almost park like setting. This angle gives you a perspective of the scope of the structure. This type of façade is not uncommon for the period in which it was built and with the refined finished rock, it creates a very imposing and strong look for this courthouse.

Rock Architecture Two

Rock Architecture Two

The second shot is the artist in me, framing the architectural lines and elements in a unique fashion that highlights the beauty of the stone. The presentation depicts the detail used in this regal structure.

Rock Architecture Three

Rock Architecture Three

The third picture takes us up to a building close to where we parked in the Grand Canyon Village. I truly couldn’t figure out what it was being used for as it was off the beaten path in an area that housed support and maintenance buildings. I was blown away by the sheer scope of the irregular rock used to create the outer wall of this structure. This shot of the corner also shows the massive timber beams used to create the roof.

Rock Architecture Four

Rock Architecture Four

This fourth shot, shows the size of some of the windows outlined with that natural rough rock wall.

Rock Architecture Five

Rock Architecture Five

The fifth shot of the same building shows an exterior stairwell wrapping around the corner. Again, the unique aspect of the rock exterior wall creates interesting pictures.

Rock Architecture Six

Rock Architecture Six

Capture number six takes us back to the rim of the Grand Canyon. I zoomed in on a shot similar to one I used last week to highlight the Lookout Studio and show the exterior rock wall of this structure. It blends into the cliff in a very natural way.

Rock Architecture Seven

Rock Architecture Seven

Number seven is of the Hopi House located at the other end of the village from the Lookout Studio. This structure was built using a Pueblo style of architecture. The rock in this structure is totally different from the other ones and creates a look that compliments the Pueblo style. I love the detail work with each individual stone.

Rock Architecture Eight

Rock Architecture Eight

Number eight focuses on the different levels of the building and the unique design of outdoor space on each level.

Rock Architecture Nine

Rock Architecture Nine

Finishing with number nine, another angle of the Hopi House, showing the ladders connecting the different levels of this Pueblo style structure. I am so use to seeing this type of structure done with an adobe finish and found this natural stone look very appealing.

Just some captures of natural stone structures from our weekend outing…thoughts?

Please visit my main gallery: TheWallGallery (All domestic orders over $60.00 – free shipping!)

Follow my work:

Facebook: TheWallGallery by Kirt Tisdale. (Page likes are always appreciated!)

Google+: TheWallGallery

Twitter: KirtWallGallery

Instagram: Kirttisdale

Tsu: KirtWallGallery

 

 

Urban Architectural Elements 2

As a follow-up to last weeks post, I wanted to share another series of art prints and the difference the media makes on them. This series I call “Looking Up”. It’s from downtown Seattle and is exactly what I call it….looking up. The first picture is the original shot.

Just like the “Street Corner” shot from last week, the original stands on its own. Now let me take it to a black and white shot.

The black and white brings another element to the picture. Without the color, the lines and contrast carry the picture. This type of black and white (using a skyscraper) is similar to a series I did for a business in San Diego. That series used all black and white photography of San Diego landmarks and highrises. They were framed using a white matte and black frame. It fit the “urban chic” of that particular office suite.

Using an abstract watercolor technique now gives that same shot a completely different look. I’ve brought the color back into the equation and actually made it a focal point. Again, this type of style would fit a contemporary, modern office environment.

So let’s move to oils….

We keep the color and the lines, but add the depth of large brush strokes. This type of art print would fit the more traditional office decor.  It makes a very a very bold statement while staying true to form.

Let’s now take it to the old world feel…..

The blue tones are about the only thing left in common with the impasto style. The gothic style of oil painting gives it an old world look and with the strong brush strokes again, bold. This type of art print would look good in an urban office that has a very traditional, classy and warm decor.

Let’s pop it up a notch…..

Just like last weeks post, the Fauvism style of oil painting takes more liberties with an abstract style and becomes a crossover between traditional and contemporary.

As you can see, the media used does impact the final presentation of the art print and the decor the print ultimately compliments. Thoughts or impressions?

These particular art prints came from my online art galleryTheWallGallery. The B&W print can be found in my Black and White Gallery, while the painted prints are from my Cityscape Gallery.  Follow my work on my Facebook page – TheWallGallery by Kirt Tisdale. (Page likes are always appreciated!) Thanks!

Urban Architectural Elements

I’ve talked about how a picture or a scene takes on a totally different “vibe” or “feel” depending on how it’s presented. I’ve taken pictures,  cropped them and suddenly it’s a whole new picture. Today, I wanted to take a look at how Urban Architectural Elements take on a totally different perspective depending on the media in which they are presented. For a good example of this, I have used a picture I took a few years back of a Seattle street corner across from The Fairmont Hotel.  I liked the framing of the scene and the artist in me wanted to present that picture in multiple ways to create different opportunities. So, let’s start with the easiest and simplest, black and white. I like black and white when there are contrasting elements and lines to make the lack of color work.

This creates a very clean and straight forward image. I can visualize this displayed with white matting and a black frame. It would work in a modern decor as well as traditional…residential or business.

Here I have taken the same picture and redone it in a sketching/watercolor style. This technique keeps the straight lines and details of the picture. This style of print would again work in a clean modern decor or an office setting.

In this print, I have used a more traditional watercolor technique which creates a softer looking picture. This starts to change the picture away from just the straight lines and precise architectural elements. By softening the picture, it moves it into a different decor approach, more traditional in appeal…again either residential or business.

Now I have taken the picture into the family of oil painting. Oil adds a different dimension and I like the impasto style as it keeps relatively true to color and composition, but adds large brush strokes further softening the picture. Works in a traditional decor for either home or office.

Using the gothic oil style, I have now taken it into an old world feel. This print has lots of warm earth tones, bold brush strokes and less detail. It creates a warm art print and becomes more about perception than detail. This type of style works in a decor that uses either earth tones or a more traditional old world flair.

And last but not least, I used the fauvist oil style. This style creates an abstract and fun approach to a print. It’s not necessarily true to form or detail, but is heavy on brush strokes and concept. It has a “modern art’ flair while still retaining a sense of old world tradition. I see this style used in a decor that is trending modern and is looking for a splash of color and concept without going totally abstract.

Again, the different approaches and styles to even the same picture creates totally different art prints.  What are your thoughts or impressions?

These particular art prints came from my online art gallery, TheWallGallery. The B&W print can be found in my Black and White Gallery, while the painted prints are from my Cityscape Gallery.  Follow my work on my Facebook page – TheWallGallery by Kirt Tisdale. (Page likes are always appreciated!) Thanks!