Tag Archives: alamo

Same Subject – Two Different Perspectives

Today I wanted to feature two pictures of the same subject matter, but from different perspectives and how that can create an entirely different result.

Guess what…same structure. When you see a subject matter that intrigues you, don’t hesitate to take shots from different angles and distances. This particular building is an old adobe ranch house located on the grounds of the Alamo in San Antonio, Texas. I applied a digital watercolor technique to soften both of them up.

Thoughts?

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Garden Lamp – Featured Art Prints

This week I’m featuring a series of three art prints. All three are of the same subject, but each having a slightly different perspective. The subject matter is a simple yard lamp, yard light or garden lamp, whatever terminology you choose to use. In creating these three prints I was looking for a somewhat abstract style to create prints that were simplistic in nature while capturing the look and feel of the setting.

The setting itself is surprising in that this lamp is attached to a wall in a garden inside the Alamo complex in San Antonio, Texas. My wife and I were visiting the River Walk and the Alamo a couple of years ago, when I spotted this simple yard lamp. What appealed to my eye was the manner in which the vine was growing around the light. There was instinctively a composition here, but I wasn’t sure what type of presentation I wanted to do for it. After experimenting with a number of concepts, I decided to move forward with this type of look. As I mentioned earlier, I wanted a simple, clean look for this composition and I think this style created just that.

Thoughts?

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Two Bougainvillea Vines

The tale of two Bougainvillea vines began about three weeks ago from a simple request.  A client had contacted me looking for an art print that had a Spanish element to it. This particular client has purchased a number of my art prints over the last couple years and I have done some custom work for her, so she knew if I didn’t have exactly what she was looking for, I could probably create it. After further discussion to understand the look she was going for, I directed her to a couple of different prints to see if those would work. What she liked is the first attachment.

The setting for this scene is the grounds of the Alamo in San Antonio, Texas. This structure is off in a corner of the grounds. I’m really not sure what it is used for as there wasn’t access into it and it is somewhat off the beaten path. I love the historic architecture of it as it has the old adobe homestead look found throughout the southwest and west from the Spanish influence. This particular print is done using a classic watercolor technique.

Now this is the part where the Bougainvillea’s come into it. “Kirt, my husband and I love this print, but wanted to know if you could put some Bougainvillea vines on the front two posts to add a pop of color?” With the help of Photoshop, not a problem. I started scouring my portfolio for Bougainvillea and remembered I had just finished some prints with them from my Cave Creek, Arizona shoot.   It isn’t quite as easy as tracing the plant and doing a cut and paste to get it to look like it had grown on the post. It’s a fair amount of trial and error and in my case, a lot of piece meal. I would take portions of the plant and with each piece create a new vine growing up each post. The following is the final product also done in the classic watercolor technique.

The Alamo Adobe with Bougainvillea

The Alamo Adobe with Bougainvillea

I like both of them for different reasons….I like the subtle, clean look of the original, but I also like the pop of color in the final one. Thoughts?

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The Hacienda

These pictures are from a time gone by in the old Southwest.

I grabbed this shot literally on the grounds of the Alamo. What I wanted to take a look at today was how the same picture done in different media creates a completely different feel to the same subject matter.

The first picture below is the original shot I took in May on the grounds of the Alamo in San Antonio. I loved the look and the rustic appeal of this scene.

Original Photograph

Original Photograph

After cropping the shot, I worked with the picture using a variety of media to create different looks for different decors.

The picture below is the black and white shot. There are enough strong lines and contrast in this picture to make a black and white interesting. Not every shot holds up in black and white.

From the B&W Gallery in Kirt's on-line Art Gallery

From the B&W Gallery in Kirt’s main art gallery

Nice contrast and this type of looks lends itself to a modern artistic decor.

Because the subject matter is “historical, rustic and of days gone by”, I also presented it in a sepia tone. The very nature of the sepia print evokes old images since prints originally used this format.

From the Sepia Gallery in Kirt's main Art Gallery.

From the Sepia Gallery in Kirt’s main art gallery.

The sepia tones automatically give you a warmer picture, not as bold as the black and white. This print would look good in a decor that embraces earth tones and/or uses items that have an old rustic appeal.

From there, I painted the scene using a traditional watercolor approach. This gives the picture a soft relaxing look. The colors become warm and soothing…

giving you a picture that invites you in to sit and relax.  This picture would look great in a casual comfortable decor.

Then, just from my own curiosity … I also painted the scene with a bolder more abstract watercolor…

The result being a much more bolder contemporary picture. This style would bring an historical subject matter into a modern contemporary decor style.

What are your thoughts? Using the same core elements, but presenting them in different styles creates totally different looks. Each of these stands on its own and is the right picture for different decors. I welcome your feedback and as always invite you to look at my main gallery: TheWallgallery.com. Thanks!