Sharlot Hall Museum – Excerpts From a Photo Shoot

A couple of weeks ago, my wife and I did a weekend getaway to one of our favorite Arizona towns, Prescott. We like Prescott as a getaway due to the fact that it is over 5000 feet in elevation and the temperature is a welcome break from the heat of Phoenix. One of the things my wife had researched and wanted to checkout was the Sharlot Hall Museum. On the grounds of the museum were the original structures of the first Governors Mansion for what had just become the realigned territory of Arizona. The other structures on the property also included original log buildings from the mid 1800’s, Victorian homes from a later error and a core museum structure with exhibits. In this blog I wanted to share a few of the shots I took of the log buildings (I keep wanting to say log cabins as most were of that size, but they were referred to as log buildings…whatever…).

The grounds were beautiful and you could wander around at your leisure. Most of the buildings had a docent to answer any questions and all of the different structures were furnished with original period pieces (another blog coming for some of those items).

We finished the tour at the Territorial Rose Garden next to the Governors Mansion. The roses were in full bloom and were beautiful (another blog with some of those shots).


This first shot is the original Governors Mansion built for the newly appointed capital of the realigned Arizona Territory by President Lincoln. I love the architectural details (no big surprise for those of you that follow my work).

Governors Mansion Arizona

Governors Mansion Arizona


 

The second capture is The Ranch House, which was built for the museum in the 1930’s to represent typical ranch houses from the 1800’s.

The Ranch House

The Ranch House


The third photograph is of Fort Misery (note the side of The Ranch House in the background). Fort Misery is the oldest log building associated with the territory of Arizona. Originally built in 1863-1864 along the banks of Granite Creek (two blocks south of the museum). It was disassembled and reassembled on the museum grounds in 1934. A trader from Santa Fe built it as a home and store.

Fort Misery

Fort Misery


The fourth and last shot is the Territorial Rose Garden on the side of the Governor’s Mansion. The territorial rose garden was created and planted in 1948. It was moved to its current location on the north side of the Governors Mansion in 1974. The move was so that the rose garden would be visible from the street aligning the museum grounds.

Territorial Rose Garden

Territorial Rose Garden

Thoughts?


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34 thoughts on “Sharlot Hall Museum – Excerpts From a Photo Shoot

  1. Darlene

    I love these old log buildings. They always amaze me how well they were constructed. I think they would have been quite cosy. I have visited many places in Arizona but have not been to Prescott.

    Reply
    1. Kirt D Tisdale Post author

      What amazed me was that fact that the center of town, has a town square with a courthouse in the middle….all of the shops line the street across from the courthouse on all four sides….the little town I spent the first 10 years of my life in (Iowa) looked identical and I know a lot of the eastern towns were built the same way…not use to seeing that same look out here in the west. Thanks for stopping by Darlene!

      Reply
      1. Darlene

        That is cool. This idea of a town square comes from Europe and was no doubt brought over with the early European settlers. Every town in Spain has one. There is often a church in the middle but a courthouse makes sense too.

      2. Kirt D Tisdale Post author

        Courthouses (at least in the midwest) were only in the towns that were the county seat…other were open squares like in New England…maybe a bandstand or gazebo….in Europe I can see the town square being a church!!

  2. lorriebowden

    I love the photos, Kirt! I also love your discerning eye and yearning for travel. I can remember driving between Prescott and Jerome…and never being more afraid (we don’t have mountains in Florida!!) And then locals told us they have a race down the mountain…BACKWARDS!!! Not sure if they were pulling our leg but going forward was enough for us!!
    Blessings, Kirt! 🌺

    Reply
    1. Kirt D Tisdale Post author

      We also found Jerome very interesting, especially coming in from the back side….you are on a mountain, round the bend and here’s this old west town half way up the mountain. Thanks for stopping by Lorrie!!

      Reply
    1. Kirt D Tisdale Post author

      They are very strong and clearly built to last….the museum has done an incredible job of maintaining not only the buildings, but the grounds also! Thanks for stopping by Irene!

      Reply
  3. Dan Antion

    Beautiful photos Kirt. I love log buildings and these appear to be in near perfect condition. I have to admit, I don’t think of Arizona having higher elevations or varying weather conditions. I may have to visit your state at some point 🙂

    Reply
    1. Kirt D Tisdale Post author

      Prescott is like Denver in elevation…lots of trees and pine forests….Flagstaff is at 7000 ft and heavily forested….very diverse state for sure…the more we tour around the more astounded we are…thanks for stopping by Dan!

      Reply
  4. Teagan Geneviene

    What a truly charming place, Kirt. I enjoyed this visit very much. As a child I was infatuated with all things “Pioneer.” There was one historic log cabin in the area and I still remember the school visit to it. You created a fascinating and lovely photo shoot. Looking forward to the subsequent ones at which you’ve hinted. Mega hugs!

    Reply
  5. Green Global Trek

    Terrific! I love log cabins…they always remind me of a toy my kids had …a box of miniature “logs” for creating cabins. So now when I see an actual log cabin it makes me think of the mini versions…
    peta

    Reply
  6. Annie

    Lovely museum and impressive preservation! You took some great photos that make me want to visit someday. I’m guessing they are all built with Ponderosa Pine. My grandparents had a summer log cabin on the Chesapeake Bay made with logs floated down from New England. My fondness for log cabin comes from those summer memories of that very old cabin packed with cousins every summer. I can still smell the chinking. Thanks for the memories!

    Reply
  7. Pingback: Sharlot Hall Museum Two – Excerpts From A Photo Shoot | thewallgalleryblog

  8. reocochran

    This was such a nice double post, Kirt! The outdoor photographs are beautiful and clear. The stone was was particularly well built and pretty, as well as the beautiful rose garden!
    I could imagine your 11 x 14″ or 8 x 10″ matted and framed art piece on a family room wall. Lovely!

    Reply
  9. Dina

    Lovely museum! I very much like log cabins like this. Thanks for sharing your great photos, Kirt!
    Warm greetings from Norway,
    Dina

    Reply
  10. Pingback: Log Houses In Gothic – Featured Art prints | thewallgalleryblog

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