Natural Stone as Architectural Elements – Excerpts from a Photo Shoot

In photography, I have a fascination with capturing interesting architectural elements. I like to create unusual perspectives to highlight form and lines of different structures. In going through my Grand Canyon portfolio, I pulled some of the shots I took of different buildings that interested me that weekend. I saw a pattern of a specific element that kept drawing my eye to each of these buildings without even realizing it at the time. Each of the buildings I photographed, were made with natural rock exterior walls. The rock in each case is obviously indigenous to the area and used to create some very interesting looks. I have attached 9 pictures that I thought were great examples of what I saw.

Rock Architecture One

Rock Architecture One

The first capture shows the front tower of the municipal courthouse in Flagstaff, Arizona. The overall building sits back from a downtown street corner, creating an almost park like setting. This angle gives you a perspective of the scope of the structure. This type of façade is not uncommon for the period in which it was built and with the refined finished rock, it creates a very imposing and strong look for this courthouse.

Rock Architecture Two

Rock Architecture Two

The second shot is the artist in me, framing the architectural lines and elements in a unique fashion that highlights the beauty of the stone. The presentation depicts the detail used in this regal structure.

Rock Architecture Three

Rock Architecture Three

The third picture takes us up to a building close to where we parked in the Grand Canyon Village. I truly couldn’t figure out what it was being used for as it was off the beaten path in an area that housed support and maintenance buildings. I was blown away by the sheer scope of the irregular rock used to create the outer wall of this structure. This shot of the corner also shows the massive timber beams used to create the roof.

Rock Architecture Four

Rock Architecture Four

This fourth shot, shows the size of some of the windows outlined with that natural rough rock wall.

Rock Architecture Five

Rock Architecture Five

The fifth shot of the same building shows an exterior stairwell wrapping around the corner. Again, the unique aspect of the rock exterior wall creates interesting pictures.

Rock Architecture Six

Rock Architecture Six

Capture number six takes us back to the rim of the Grand Canyon. I zoomed in on a shot similar to one I used last week to highlight the Lookout Studio and show the exterior rock wall of this structure. It blends into the cliff in a very natural way.

Rock Architecture Seven

Rock Architecture Seven

Number seven is of the Hopi House located at the other end of the village from the Lookout Studio. This structure was built using a Pueblo style of architecture. The rock in this structure is totally different from the other ones and creates a look that compliments the Pueblo style. I love the detail work with each individual stone.

Rock Architecture Eight

Rock Architecture Eight

Number eight focuses on the different levels of the building and the unique design of outdoor space on each level.

Rock Architecture Nine

Rock Architecture Nine

Finishing with number nine, another angle of the Hopi House, showing the ladders connecting the different levels of this Pueblo style structure. I am so use to seeing this type of structure done with an adobe finish and found this natural stone look very appealing.

Just some captures of natural stone structures from our weekend outing…thoughts?

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36 thoughts on “Natural Stone as Architectural Elements – Excerpts from a Photo Shoot

  1. sheridegrom - From the literary and legislative trenches.

    Your talent never ceases to amaze me. Tom happened to be awake for a bit a while ago so I put your blog up on the wide screen and he really enjoyed not only this post but many others. Of course I had to share my excitement of the balloons! Tom often uses a critical eye and doesn’t hesitate to share his thoughts with me. His comments were all good! I know he really enjoyed what he was seeing as he asked if I would pull up your blog on his laptop for future viewing when he wanted. That made me happy as I have a hard time finding things that will help keep his mind occupied when he’s awake due to the pain. Thank you!!! Do you have shots of stone bridges? I ask as a few arched stone bridges from the 1800’s remain in Kansas. The limestone was cut out of the ground. The bridge at the top of my blog is called ‘The Fromm Bridge’ in Cowley County, Kansas. Tom took the photo. It’s near where I grew up.

    Reply
    1. Kirt D Tisdale Post author

      Thank you again for the kind words…..it means so much to me especially with Tom’s background. I have little stone bridge I took in Maine, but nothing large. I know exactly what you are talking about having grown up in Iowa where limestone was used in a multitude of construction venues….I think I need a road trip through that part of the country😀!!!

      Reply
      1. sheridegrom - From the literary and legislative trenches.

        A road trip sounds like a grand plan. I’ve been wanting to return to Kansas to visit the stone bridges in Cowley County. I don’t have family left but my best friend from first grade still lives there. Twice a year guided tours are hosted by an art gallery. I’ve always wanted to make one of those tours. I so love those old back roads. Lots of memories there.
        Tom was clear about his wishes to view your photographs more and I’m looking forward to spending the time with him when he does.

  2. MichelleMarie

    Wow the walls of the buildings with the surrounding grand canyon rocks are stunning Kirt! I really like these! I’ve only see the Grand Canyon flying over it so these are so wonderful! I am so amazed at the different colors of the rocks. Wow! 🙂

    Reply
  3. reocochran

    All of the texture and toughness really make these exciting pieces displaying colorful architecture, Kirt. Taking photos like these is not easy to capture the beauty as you do here.

    Reply

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