Tis The Season -2021

The beginning of December is typically when our Camellia tree and bushes start their winter bloom here in Los Angeles. It also marks the beginning of the Christmas season, so I thought it appropriate to share three camellia captures with words for the holiday season!!

Peace and Joy – Pink And White Camellia Bloom
Love – Camellia Soft Pink Bloom
Faith – Red Camellia Bloom

Thoughts?

Please visit my main gallery: TheWallGallery

Follow me on social media:

Facebook: TheWallGallery by Kirt Tisdale.

Twitter: KirtWallGallery

Instagram: Kirttisdale

Old Railroad Car – Three Artistic Interpretations

In continuing with the theme from last week, this week I’m featuring an old train car. And not to be too redundant, but as I stated last week: “Anytime I create an art print, I have typically worked the subject matter into different forms and presentations. When I hit a look I like, I spend more time working it into a “final product”. Sometimes I end up with more than one version. If I feel strongly about the final presentation in each version, I will keep them. Having said that, I do try and limit it to no more than three of anyone subject matter.” Today’s blog features an old train car located on a hiking path along the river in Rockford, Michigan. At the time I took the photograph in December of 2015, it was abandoned, but looked like it had been used as a diner.

As I did last week, the first version I’m showing was created using a black and white sketching technique.

The Old Train Car

The second version just like last week adds colored to the sketching technique.

The Red Railroad Car

Then the third version was created using an abstract watercolor approach.

Old Train

Thoughts?

Please visit my main gallery: TheWallGallery

Follow me on social media:

Facebook: TheWallGallery by Kirt Tisdale.

Twitter: KirtWallGallery

Instagram: Kirttisdale

Covered Wagon – Three Artistic Presentations

Anytime I create an art print, I have typically worked the subject matter into different forms and presentations. When I hit a look I like, I spend more time working it into a “final product”. Sometimes I end up with more than one version. If I feel strongly about the final presentation in each version, I will keep them. Having said that, I do try and limit it to no more than three of anyone subject matter. Today’s blog features a covered wagon I photographed in the Sharlott Hall Museum in Prescott, Arizona.

The first example is the covered wagon created using a black and white sketching technique.

Black And White Sketched Covered Wagon

The next version takes the B&W sketching technique and inserts color creating a color sketching of the wagon.

Covered Wagon Sketched

The third version uses an impasto painting technique which creates a completely different look for this covered wagon. This painting style creates strong and bold brush strokes.

Blue Covered Wagon

Thoughts?

Please visit my main gallery: TheWallGallery

Follow me on social media:

Facebook: TheWallGallery by Kirt Tisdale.

Twitter: KirtWallGallery

Instagram: Kirttisdale

Gothic Earth Tones on Urban Architecture

Taking a complete 180 from last weeks abstract art prints, this week I’m showcasing two art prints I created using an old world gothic earth tone approach. The earth tone approach uses rich warm colors with a brownish hue. The two subjects are buildings representing both the east and the west coast of the United States. I have a love of architectural details and like presentations that capitalize on those details.

The first one is from the New England area and features a classic architectural style which works really well with a “gothic’ presentation. I love the capping to the roof lines as well as over the windows.

New England Urban

The second print is a building in downtown Seattle and I used a less traditional viewpoint of the structure by looking down on it. This perspective highlights the “corner” aspect of this buildings location. The overall architecture is more modern than the first example, but still traditional to the early part of the 20th Century. On this print the gothic style highlights not only the building, but the details from the first floor and the corner pedestrian activity.

The Downtown Corner

Each print has the same overall color tones, but present two very different buildings that in my opinion are highlighted using the gothic style.

Thoughts?

Please visit my main gallery: TheWallGallery

Follow me on social media:

Facebook: TheWallGallery by Kirt Tisdale.

Twitter: KirtWallGallery

Instagram: Kirttisdale

Abstract Lines And Curves

This week I wanted to share three art prints I created from the same drawing. They are art prints I created using digital drawing. I drew curves at random and kept drawing more so that the various shapes intersected. As I couldn’t decide what color hue I wanted for this drawing, I created three of them in different hues. I finished by drawing a slightly larger outline of the shapes in black.

For the first one, I used Purple and Blue for the colors.

Abstract Lines And Curves In Purple And Blue

For the second one I went to a variety of blue hues.

Abstract Lines And Curves In Blue

For the third one I switched it up and went with red hues.

Abstract Lines And Curves In Red

I played with other hues, but settled on these three for the final prints.

Thoughts?

Please visit my main gallery: TheWallGallery

Follow me on social media:

Facebook: TheWallGallery by Kirt Tisdale.

Twitter: KirtWallGallery

Instagram: Kirttisdale

Seagull Friend on Oceanside Pier

As a follow up to last weeks post on the Oceanside Pier, I have 4 additional shots I wanted to share this week. These are not of the pier itself and are in color which works better with this subject matter. As one would expect around an ocean pier there are many seagulls flying around at all times. I was so focused on the pier itself until the end of the shoot. At that point, I was out at the end of the pier and getting ready to call it a day and head back in when a seagull caught my eye flying not too far from where I was standing. Sometimes I’m a little slow on moving my camera attention (especially when I was so focused on the pier) to a different subject matter. This was one of those times as the seagull flew around my head and then landed on a portion of the rail right in front of me as if to say….”no worries, I’ll pose for you”. I started taking pictures and started moving around to get different angles, lighting and background. From all of those captures, I decided to post the last four I took as they best demonstrate the “models” attitude about the photoshoot.

The first one depicts the seagull cooperating and allowing me to shoot a number of captures as I moved around getting different perspectives.

Seagull 1

The seagull was so good to allow me subtle differences as I snapped away.

Seagull 2

I then backed up and circled around as he moved ever so slightly to get some sun and a lighting change as I captured an angle that included the shoreline.

Seagull 3

I was surprised by the cooperation and patience with all of my movements, but it was at this point I think the seagull thought enough is enough. Right after the above shot……

Seagull 4

he turned his head to tune me out and held it perfectly still for quite some time to ignore me. Then without a look back or anything took off and flew very far away from the pier as if to say…enough already!! Chill dude….enough is enough!!

Thoughts?

Please visit my main gallery: TheWallGallery

Follow me on social media:

Facebook: TheWallGallery by Kirt Tisdale.

Twitter: KirtWallGallery

Instagram: Kirttisdale

The Longest Pier on the Western United States Coastline

Today I’m featuring a photo shoot I did a couple of weeks ago. The subject matter is the Oceanside Pier in Southern California. I had not been to the pier for a few years, but remembered it well. It is the longest pier along the western US coastline at 1954 feet (596m). The current pier was built in 1987 replacing a number of prior piers lost to stormy weather. For more information: Wikipedia. The town of Oceanside is located in northern San Diego County just south of Camp Pendleton (which lies along the coast between San Diego County and Orange County to the north).

I had a couple of hours of free time (I was a car pool buddy for my wife coming and going from Northern Los Angeles to a bridal shower for my niece at my sisters home in San Diego) during the afternoon and had decided to do this photo shoot. The pier is very impressive and I had just viewed another photographers photoshoot of a pier and was reminded how impressive the architectural structure of these larger piers were. I also chose to do the shoot in black and white as I like the architectural detail that is highlighted in a monochromatic shoot such as this. For some reason I have always been drawn to shots under the structure of piers, thus the number of those on this shoot. At the end of the pier was a restaurant (prior to Covid), which we had frequented. I’m assuming a new tenant will be found as it is a great location.

I open the shoot with a shot I took walking from my parking spot to the beach area underneath the pier for the next few shots.

Oceanside, California Pier

Next up are the shots I took of the under structure in the order I took them.

The Support Of The Pier
Pier 3
Pier 4
Pier 5

Coming out from underneath on the other side of the pier which gives you another appreciation of how far out it goes with the restaurant building on the end.

Pier 6

I was walking out to the end and stepped off on one of the “pop outs” you see in this photo.

Pier 7

Passing the tower structures on each side as in seen above, I took this shot approaching the restaurant structure on the end.

Pier 8

And on the other side of the pier with all of the people fishing.

Fishing Off The End Of The Pier

The last capture is from the end of the pier next to the former restaurant looking back towards the coastline. You can see just how far out the pier goes from this perspective as well as from the shore looking out to this point.

Pier 10

In case you were wondering why three of these shots have names under them, those are the ones I added to my galleries. It always amazes me how many shots I take and how I whittle them down to just a few favorites. If any of those I hadn’t named strike you as “gallery worthy” let me know!! Thanks!!

Thoughts?

Please visit my main gallery: TheWallGallery

Follow me on social media:

Facebook: TheWallGallery by Kirt Tisdale.

Twitter: KirtWallGallery

Instagram: Kirttisdale

Butterflies in a Variety of Colors

This week I am sharing a series of new prints I created of butterflies. The process for these prints started a couple of weeks ago when out of the blue I remembered a couple of photos I took of butterflies over a year ago. Not sure where that came from, but I dug out the photos. They really weren’t much to work with as I only took them to remind me to pursue butterflies as a possible subject. It only took that long for that particular process to work for me…duh!! Anyway, I took the subject matter and started drawing butterflies. Still not sure what I was going to do, I kept after the drawings and finally was able to complete a look I liked. To pop the color, I used a photoshop technique to make the butterflies colors take on a texture. After trying to recreate more butterflies, I simply copied the one drawing I liked the best…resized it as needed and pivoted them in different directions. I then started playing with colors as I wasn’t sure what the final color was going to be. This led to more experimentation and various colors. To finish the look I was after, I chose a soft background in similar shades to the butterflies. In Photoshop one of the brushes paints in leaf shapes, so I used that in the various colors and sizes. I then lowered the opacity to soften it as a back drop. The final result was five different colored butterflies on five different prints and then one print combining all five.

Yellow Butterflies
Red Butterflies
Purple Butterflies
Blue Butterflies
Green Butterflies
Colorful Butterflies

Thoughts?

Please visit my main gallery: TheWallGallery

Follow me on social media:

Facebook: TheWallGallery by Kirt Tisdale.

Twitter: KirtWallGallery

Instagram: Kirttisdale

Reach Out

Reach Out

Using an abstract watercolor I created of a saguaro cactus in the Arizona Desert as a background, I felt like this motivational thought was the perfect fit. I believe He has chosen a path for each of us to walk. Often times in life, we find ourselves off that path and somewhat lost in where to go or what direction to take. Our guide is always there just waiting for us to take His hand and He will guide us not only back to the path, but keep us on the path.

I usually think of a forest path to best typify this thought process, but living a few years in the desert and being a fan of hiking….just as true there as anywhere else…it’s important to stay on the path….snakes, scorpions, etc.

Thoughts?

Please visit my main gallery: TheWallGallery

Follow me on social media:

Facebook: TheWallGallery by Kirt Tisdale.

Twitter: KirtWallGallery

Instagram: Kirttisdale

West Coast Lighthouses

I love the architecture of lighthouses and have done a number of prints from both the east and west coasts of the United States. As a wrap-up from the coastal theme over the last few weeks, I have attached some of my recent work from the west coast. Some of these lighthouses have been featured on past blogs, but these are all new prints of five of them. So, going south to north along the Oregon Coastline into Washington

The first one is the Cape Blanco Lighthouse. The lighthouse is located on the southwestern coastline of Oregon. The lighthouse was built over a three year period and was opened in 1871. (For more info: Wikipedia)

Cape Blanco Lighthouse Watercolor

Moving north up the Oregon coastline, we encounter Umpqua Lighthouse. The first print is the top portion of Unpqua (I wanted to capture the red light light used as the beacon) and the second print is the lighthouse itself. The first Umpqua lighthouse was built in 1855 and was lit in 1857. It had to be replaced due to seasonal flooding with the current one, which was started in 1892 and first lit in 1894. (For more info: Wikipedia)

Umpqua Lighthouse Watercolor
Umpqua River Lighthouse Sketched

Still moving north along the Oregon coastline, we encounter Yaquina Head LIghthouse which is the tallest lighthouse in Oregon at 93 feet (28 m). It started operation in 1863. (For more info: Wikipedia)

Yaquina Head Lighthouse in Watercolor

Going further north along the Oregon coastline, we encounter Cape Mears. Cape Meares was built in 1890 to serve Tillamook Bay. In 1963 the original was demolished and replaced with the current tower. (For more info: Wikipedia)

Cape Meares Lighthouse in Watercolor

And last but not least on this little tour, we just cross the Columbia River into the state of Washington and find North Head Lighthouse. The North Head Lighthouse was constructed in 1897 to replace a prior lighthouse that couldn’t be seen by ships coming from the north. (For more info: Wikipedia)

North Head Lighthouse

Thoughts?

Please visit my main gallery: TheWallGallery

Follow me on social media:

Facebook: TheWallGallery by Kirt Tisdale.

Twitter: KirtWallGallery

Instagram: Kirttisdale