Getting Your Christmas Tree

christmas-tree-shopping

I just want to start this post with saying that the attached picture is what is in my head when I think of going to get a Christmas Tree. Do we really go out to the woods to cut down a tree…only in a fantasy world. When our girls were young, we always went to a Christmas Tree farm to find just the right tree…anything less than 9 feet wasn’t acceptable. After the year of the tree falling and needing wired to the wall, good old Dad went out and bought a fake tree. I won’t bore you with all of the details of the mishaps of putting the tree up that year, but suffice it to say, it put me over the edge and a fake tree was now my plan of attack. The following year when I came home with this 9 foot artificial tree, there was a minor revolt in the household. My wife and the two oldest girls refused to help put it up. Our youngest was more than willing to help Dad with the tree and it became our tradition to put the tree together, just the two of us and then the rest would come in to decorate. Ok, so she was only two when this started, but the branches were color coded and alphabetized. Over the years she learned her alphabet and colors quite well. It has become a family joke that Dad taught her how to read putting the tree together. Fast forward 24+ years and the tree still looks really good…(true story)…

I share all of this as every family has their traditions around getting their Christmas  tree, putting it up and decorating it. I wanted to share what is in my head when I assemble the alphabetized and color coded branches of our now 24 year old tree, the attached picture!!

May the Joy of the Season be with you and your family!!

 

Happy Thanksgiving!!

Happy Thanksgiving!!

Happy Thanksgiving!!

Happy Thanksgiving!! Love this time of year to enjoy family and friends and reflect on how much we have to be thankful for. I am blessed with a wonderful wife and three incredible daughters, two awesome son-in-laws and a third soon to be son-in-law (wedding July of 2017) and the pending arrival of our first grandchild!! May the season find you healthy, happy and thankful!!

Territorial Rose Garden: Prescott, Arizona – Excerpts From A Photo Shoot

This is the third and last post in a series about a weekend getaway my wife and I did to Prescott, Arizona in late October. The series has focused on our visit to the Sharlot Hall Museum. In the first blog, I included some shots of the log buildings that are on the grounds of the museum and the second blog focused on shots I took inside some of those log structures. This last post is of the Territorial Rose Garden on the grounds. The garden was originally planted in 1948 on the south side of the Governor’s Mansion. In 1974, it was moved to its current location on the north side of the Governor’s Mansion where it can be seen from the street. We were fortunate in capturing the garden at its peak for the season as we head further into fall and winter.

Territorial Rose Garden

Territorial Rose Garden


Enjoy these macro shots of stunning blooms from a beautiful rose garden.

Arizona Territorial Rose Garden - Yellow

Arizona Territorial Rose Garden – Yellow

Arizona Territorial Rose Garden - Red

Arizona Territorial Rose Garden – Red

Arizona Territorial Rose Garden - Purple

Arizona Territorial Rose Garden – Purple

Arizona Territorial Rose Garden - Pink

Arizona Territorial Rose Garden – Pink

Arizona Territorial Rose Garden - Pink Bud

Arizona Territorial Rose Garden – Pink Bud

Arizona Territorial Rose Garden - Pink and Orange

Arizona Territorial Rose Garden – Pink and Orange

Arizona Territorial Rose Garden - Orange

Arizona Territorial Rose Garden – Orange

Arizona Territorial Rose Garden - Orange Bud

Arizona Territorial Rose Garden – Orange Bud

Thoughts?


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Sharlot Hall Museum Two – Excerpts From A Photo Shoot

My last post was about a weekend getaway my wife and I did to Prescott, Arizona. The post focused on our visit to the Sharlot Hall Museum. I included some shots of the log buildings that are on the grounds of the museum and this week I wanted to include shots I took inside some of those log structures.


The first two photographs are of a kitchen and then a bedroom within the log Governor’s Mansion.

Sharlot Hall - Kitchen

Sharlot Hall – Kitchen

Sharlot Hall - Bedroom

Sharlot Hall – Bedroom


This third shot focuses in on the chair and chest by the bedroom window. Notice the chair, it folds up. What caught me eye wasn’t just the fact that the chair folds up, but the fact we actually have a similar chair from the same era that also folds up, but ours is a rocking chair. When we first got married (many moons ago), we were trying to acquire furniture and both of us still being in college (yes, I said many moons ago), we were willing to take anything. My parents remembered some old antique furniture stored in the attic and offered us anything we wanted. We did acquire a few pieces and the chair was one of them. I was told the chair was called a “wake rocker” and had been handed down from grandparents. I stripped it and reupholstered it and all these years later, it now sits in storage at our house waiting for one of our daughters to take an interest in it.

Sharlot Hall - Chair and Chest

Sharlot Hall – Chair and Chest


The rest of the shots capture other furnishings within these log buildings.

Sharlot Hall - Desk and Chair

Sharlot Hall – Desk and Chair

Sharlot Hall - Cabinet

Sharlot Hall – Cabinet

Sharlot Hall - Pot Belly Stove

Sharlot Hall – Pot Belly Stove

Thoughts?


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Sharlot Hall Museum – Excerpts From a Photo Shoot

A couple of weeks ago, my wife and I did a weekend getaway to one of our favorite Arizona towns, Prescott. We like Prescott as a getaway due to the fact that it is over 5000 feet in elevation and the temperature is a welcome break from the heat of Phoenix. One of the things my wife had researched and wanted to checkout was the Sharlot Hall Museum. On the grounds of the museum were the original structures of the first Governors Mansion for what had just become the realigned territory of Arizona. The other structures on the property also included original log buildings from the mid 1800’s, Victorian homes from a later error and a core museum structure with exhibits. In this blog I wanted to share a few of the shots I took of the log buildings (I keep wanting to say log cabins as most were of that size, but they were referred to as log buildings…whatever…).

The grounds were beautiful and you could wander around at your leisure. Most of the buildings had a docent to answer any questions and all of the different structures were furnished with original period pieces (another blog coming for some of those items).

We finished the tour at the Territorial Rose Garden next to the Governors Mansion. The roses were in full bloom and were beautiful (another blog with some of those shots).


This first shot is the original Governors Mansion built for the newly appointed capital of the realigned Arizona Territory by President Lincoln. I love the architectural details (no big surprise for those of you that follow my work).

Governors Mansion Arizona

Governors Mansion Arizona


 

The second capture is The Ranch House, which was built for the museum in the 1930’s to represent typical ranch houses from the 1800’s.

The Ranch House

The Ranch House


The third photograph is of Fort Misery (note the side of The Ranch House in the background). Fort Misery is the oldest log building associated with the territory of Arizona. Originally built in 1863-1864 along the banks of Granite Creek (two blocks south of the museum). It was disassembled and reassembled on the museum grounds in 1934. A trader from Santa Fe built it as a home and store.

Fort Misery

Fort Misery


The fourth and last shot is the Territorial Rose Garden on the side of the Governor’s Mansion. The territorial rose garden was created and planted in 1948. It was moved to its current location on the north side of the Governors Mansion in 1974. The move was so that the rose garden would be visible from the street aligning the museum grounds.

Territorial Rose Garden

Territorial Rose Garden

Thoughts?


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Autumn Colors – Featured Art Print

 

 

Autumn Colors: a wall art print where I used an impasto oil technique creating this scene. This technique uses bold brush strokes and bright color tones creating a traditional oil painting look. This particular wall art print depicts trees in a park at their peak of fall colors.

The setting is Issaquah, Washington located in the foothills of the Cascade Mountain range to the east of Seattle. Once a small stop along the rail line between Seattle to the west and North Bend in the Cascade Mountains to the east, this town has become a thriving and vibrant suburb within the metropolitan area of Seattle. Thoughts?


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Coastal Bluff – Featured Art Print

Coastal Bluff is a wall art print I created using an impasto oil looking technique to create this scene. This technique uses bold brush strokes and bright colors creating a traditional oil painting look. This particular wall art print depicts the view looking up the coastline of bluffs overlooking the Pacific Ocean.

The setting is the rugged Oregon coastline, which is known for dramatic scenery of tall tree covered bluffs and the beautiful Pacific Ocean for as far as the eye can see. If you look real close, you can just make out the Pacific Coast Highway as a thin white strip along the bluffs. Thoughts?


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